National Pain Care Providers Day

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Every dog has his day, right?

In our culture, groups, individuals, and even inanimate objects are frequently honored with their very own special twenty-four hours. These days of recognition give us pauses to examine their meanings and further their causes.

But there’s a compassionate and deserving group of people who have not yet made the list…the caring people who treat our pain. 

For now, National Pain Care Providers Day is only a dream.

It doesn’t exist.

It should.
It can.
And it will…with your help.

National Pain Care Providers Day
March 20, 2015

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It’s time to recognize all who generously and selflessly strive to alleviate suffering. This includes physicians, dentists, nurses, therapists, emergency responders, trainers, masseuses, pharmacists, caregivers, mothers and anyone who gives of her or himself to ease pain.

Why is National Pain Care Providers Day necessary?

Pain is universal. It is the most common medical complaint. There is no escaping it. Pain touches every life. And as our population continues to age, pain is occurring in epidemic proportion.

Pain care is sometimes simple and sometimes extremely complicated. Caregivers can feel tremendous pressure from government agencies, police, lawyers, administrators, addicts, abusers, patients, families, administrators, insurance providers, and the media. As a result, caregivers are too often reduced to feeling “You’re damned if you do and damned if you don’t.”

In reality, they should be praised because of what they do.

Caregivers who persevere deserve our support, gratitude and, at the very least, a day of recognition.

Popular opinions regarding pain care and treatments are evolving rapidly. Taking a special day to spotlight best practices and inspire possibilities would not only bolster the advancement of this vital field of medicine, it would encourage the legions of those who suffer in lonely silence. Less suffering and better lives for all are the goals.

Celebrating National Pain Care Providers Day on March 20, 2015 – the first day of spring – is akin to celebrating hope. From this day forward, the vernal equinox, light overcomes darkness.

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So let’s join together and recognize the first day of spring, March 20, 2015, as National Pain Care Providers Day. Let’s make this day special for the special people who treat our pain. Start by sharing your comments and ideas on this blog and/or emailing paincareprovidersday@gmail.com. Pass along the message on social media (Twitter, Facebook, etc.) and contact your civic leaders. Be a vital part of this movement.

Let Hercules himself do what he may,
The cat will mew and dog will have his day.
~ William Shakespeare’s Hamlet

You are the playwright now.
The parchment is blank.
Imagine.
Create.

And celebrate!

National Pain Care Providers Day
March 20, 2015

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Basic Pain Care Certification

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The consequences of pain…

A young mother is terrified helplessly watching her child spiral toward death in anaphylactic shock, because she did not know that an allergy to aspirin could also mean an allergy to ibuprofen.

An elderly man is no longer breathing, because he mistakenly thought he could break his pill in half to save money; when in fact, this caused the immediate release of a lethal dose from his time-release pill. He will die before the ambulance can arrive but could have been saved by a simple subcutaneous injection.

A business executive is transfused her tenth unit of whole blood, but it will not save her from dying from the hemorrhaging ulcer caused by excessive over-the-counter pain medications.

A young football star slumps silently in a corner at his high school friend’s party. Pills acquired from various unlocked medicine cabinets are coursing through his arteries. In three days his grieving parents will be struggling with the decision to remove him from life support.

With alarming frequency, stories like these touch every family.

All are preventable.

 

The consequences of pain…

 

More costly than cancer.

More deadly than car crashes.

More likely than a heart attack.

More common than the common cold.

 

With pain being so ubiquitous, so serious, so PAINFUL, why do we still not know how best to deal with the pain epidemic?

Perhaps, it is precisely because we don’t know?

Then, we should learn.

We should become knowledgeable, skilled, competent, and even certified.

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By “we” I mean everyone – not only health care providers. Pain and pain’s consequences touch every life. We all have a stake.

Lifeguards, plumbers, electricians, firemen, police, pilots, engineers, lawyers, nurses, pharmacists, physicians, etc., etc., etc., must earn certifications. Similarly, by the millions, people of all ages achieve certification in Basic Life Support – and we regularly hear stories of how a bystander stepped in to save a life. A standardized and universal understanding of pain, its treatments, complications, emergencies, and prevention could have similar results.

This point is bolstered by a recent letter from the American Society of Addiction Medicine calling upon the White House to:

…focus holistically on provider and community education, overdose death prevention and increased access to treatment, in order to effectively manage the (opioid) epidemic.

Knowledge is power.

It is time we, as a community, put that power to work.

The roadmap is clear. Like the American Heart Association’s Basic Life Support certification, Basic Pain Care (BPC) can be taught in a standardized algorithmic manner. Learning can be didactic and hands-on. For most, it would only take a few hours to master the skills, earn the certification, and acquire the confidence.

 

A Basic Pain Care curriculum might include:

– Wellness and prevention (diet, exercise, stress)

– Acute care (ice, heat, etc.)

– Over the counter medications

– Prescription medications

– Opioids

– Alternative and complementary treatments

– Drug abuse prevention, recognition, and treatment

– Regulations

– Pitfalls and risks

– Emergency procedures (overdose, seizure, etc.)

 

Imagine how confident you would feel if you knew the best and safest way to treat pain, regardless of the situation – acute, chronic, traumatic, post-operatively, and palliative. Imagine that everyone knew.

 

Imagine the suffering that would be eased.

Imagine the resources that would be spared.

Imagine the lives that would be saved.

Imagine the tears that would never be shed.

 

Now make it real. Join with me in establishing the Basic Pain Care Certification. We can start by getting connected. Share this article. Offer your comments. Follow my Confluential Truth blog and the Twitter account @jamespmurphymd. Email your thoughts to basicpaincare@gmail.com.

Change the consequences of pain.

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