It’s only words…

words matter

 

Words matter. So when The Courier-Journal published Laura Ungar’s timely article on “addicted” babies, I seized the opportunity to clarify the terms: physical dependence and addiction. They are not interchangeable and the difference is important…

 

Letter to the editor, published in The Courier-Journal, March 19, 2014:

Every hour a baby is born in this country to a mother who is abusing drugs. Thank you, Laura Ungar, for shedding light on the problem in Sunday’s Courier-Journal. However, the word “addicted” in the title is misleading. Addiction is a chronic disorder involving the reward circuits of the brain, leading to: craving, emotional dysfunction, and continued use despite harm.

A fetus exposed to the mother’s drugs may be born “physically dependent,” which, while horrible, is temporary. Anyone can expect to become physically dependent on a drug they take for a long time.

And withdrawal can be severe, but when it is over it is over. In contrast, the disease of addiction is a chronic condition that, without treatment, is progressive and can result in lifelong disability or death.

Almost all addicts have been physically dependent on drugs, but vastly fewer people who find themselves “physically dependent” on drugs (i.e. pain patients) are addicts. None of the babies born physically dependent can be considered “addicted.”

*

James Patrick Murphy, MD

*

*

My letter was in response to this article:

Kentucky addicted babies increasing despite pain-pill crackdown

by Laura Ungar, lungar@courier-journal.com 9:02 p.m. EDT March 14, 2014

IS THERE METHOD TO THIS MARCH MADNESS?

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To prescribe or not to prescribe Zohydro ER…

In March 2014, Zohydro ER (hydrocodone extended-release) was introduced to the market. Never in my medical lifetime do I recall a medication stirring such angst. Worries of mass overdoses, backdoor FDA conspiracies, and blatant disregard for the public wellbeing abound. Is there method to this March madness?

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Some background…

Zohydro ER is a pain pill that, when taken by mouth, is released slowly over twelve hours. The active ingredient, hydrocodone, is an opioid (i.e. narcotic) that’s been around for decades in a short-acting pill form (e.g. Lortab, Vicodin, Norco) and has historically been combined with APAP (a.k.a. acetaminophen, Tylenol).  The FDA considers hydrocodone-APAP combination pills to be relatively less addictive and designates them as a schedule-three drug. Physicians can prescribe schedule-three drugs over the phone, with up to six refills. By contrast, schedule-two drugs (e.g. morphine, oxycodone, oxymorphone), even when combined with APAP, are considered more addictive, can’t be called in, and can’t be refilled without a new hard-copy prescription.

Because it is effective for pain, relatively well tolerated, and convenient to prescribe, hydrocodone-APAP pills have become the most commonly prescribed opioid in the United States.  It’s therefore not surprising that, since there’s so much in circulation, hydrocodone-APAP pills are frequently the most available opioid for abusers to abuse.  Add to this the legitimate worry about acetaminophen (APAP) overuse causing liver failure, and you can understand our leaders’ concerns surrounding this pain medication.

Enter Zohydro ER, the first extended-release hydrocodone pill without APAP. It’s easy on the liver and lasts twelve hours; so people with around-the-clock pain may need fewer pills per day. Additionally, it’s a schedule-two drug. In summary, Zohydro ER is a long-lasting version of a widely used and effective opioid, which until now had only been available in combination with acetaminophen.  So why the controversy?

Aye, here’s the rub…

Zohydro ER does not have any of the new and popular tamper-resistant technologies; e.g. a matrix that won’t dissolve easily, or a coating that is difficult to crush.  Instead, the makers took advantage of a delivery system (SODAS) already used successfully in a number other of extended-release drugs such as: Ritalin LA, Focalin XR, Luvox CR, and Avinza.

OxyContin and Opana ER are two examples of opioids that manufacturers took off the market briefly for reformulation as tamper-resistant.  However, while the changes have made them more difficult to snort or inject, many addicts still find ways to abuse these drugs or have just moved on to heroin. Tamper-resistant does not mean tamper-proof.

By the way, the generic form of Opana ER (oxymorphone extended-release) was not reformulated and is still available without tamper-resistant technology. Also, consider that Avinza (morphine extended-release), which employs the same sustained-release system (SODAS) as Zohydro ER, has neither been recalled nor been required to undergo reformulation.  In reality, probably 90% of the opioids in circulation do not have tamper-resistant formulations.

That’s why I have difficulty understanding the uproar over Zohydro ER. As a pain specialist, I welcome another effective treatment to offer chronic pain sufferers. Sure, I’d be happier if it had a hard coating or some other “deterrent” to abuse. But in reality, Zohydro ER is, for all practical purposes, neither safer nor more dangerous than many of the drugs I already prescribe with success. So far, tamper-resistant innovations have not been proven to be effective in the big scheme of things. All opioids, regardless of the formulation, must be prescribed with caution and careful monitoring.

According to the American Society of Addiction Medicine, there are four main factors that contribute to a drug being addictive:

  1. How much will it cost me?  All things considered equal, people will choose a drug that is cheaper.
  2. How fast does it get to my brain? Hydrocodone is water-soluble and actually diffuses into the brain slower than many other opioids.
  3. What kind of a buzz will I get? Opioids stimulate the brain’s “reward circuit.” There is no proof that hydrocodone is any worse in this regard than other opioids.
  4. How much of it can I get my hands on? People will abuse what is available to them. Since hydrocodone is the most prescribed opioid, expect it to be one of the most abused. It follows that if Zohydro ER floods the market it will be abused.

Therefore, my recommendations to physicians are:

  1. Prescribe Zohydro ER in the lowest dose possible, for the shortest duration of time, and only if the benefits outweigh the risks.
  2. Monitor regularly for effectiveness, side effects, and patient compliance.
  3. Educate yourself and your patient.
  4. Follow guidelines and regulations faithfully.

By the way, that’s my advice to physicians regardless of which opioid they prescribe.

Zohydro ER may not be tamper-resistant, but tamper-resistant drugs are not super heroes. Do not expect them to save us from the real villain.

The real villain is not the FDA, not the drug company, not the drug, and not the patient.

The villain is the disease of addiction.

Focus on the disease. Prevent the disease. Treat the disease.

This Zohydro hullabaloo is a prime opportunity to shine light on the problems surrounding prescription drug abuse and addiction. Let’s take advantage of it.

And stop the madness.

*

me and c arm

James Patrick Murphy, MD, MMM

Board-certified in Pain Management, Addiction Medicine & Anesthesiology

Can We Make a Deep Run?

It’s March and that means basketball assumes center stage. So I decided to share my most basketball friendly eVoice.  A winning season requires a combination of passion, hard work and talent. But making a “deep run” in the tournament demands teamwork.

brackets

Do we have what it takes?

*****

LeBron, Trust, and the Power to Save our Profession

Recently my son and I made the trip to Indianapolis to see the Pacers play the Heat for a chance to go to the NBA finals.

pacers game

It was do or die for the Pacers, who were going up against the world’s best player, LeBron James. Even from the nosebleed section, it was clear that James was bigger, faster, and stronger.  He ran. He jumped. He rebounded. He dunked. He grabbed the spotlight.

lebron dunking on pacers

And he lost.

murphy speech at pres celeb

In my remarks at our Greater Louisville Medical Society’s Presidents’ Celebration on May 19th, I touched upon the concept that our team, a.k.a. our “tribe,” can reach our winning potential only if the pervasive attitude is “together we can be great.”

we are great

But is this possible?

It is hard to be together. There are so many barriers between physicians these days. We used to hang out in the doctors’ lounges, see each other on rounds, meet each other at seminars, and even pick up the phone and talk to one another. The GLMS roster, affectionately known as the “mug book,” included our picture, address, home phone number, and spouse’s name. A quick flip through its pages and you felt like you belonged to something special and could connect at a moment’s notice. But now we are partitioned into subgroups defined by things like specialty, locale, hospital affiliation, and employer.

It is critical that we reconnect, not just with colleagues but also with our passion. Deserve the privilege of our patient – physician bonds.  Be worthy of the immense trust gifted in this relationship. Trust is inherent to our profession and is born at the intersection of science and art. Trust is powerful yet fragile. Trust must be nurtured, honored, and protected.  By acting in our patients’ best interests, trust is sustained.

Are we powerful enough to save a profession?

Faced with so many dilemmas – where we will work, who we will work for, what we will earn, and how we will collaborate – our temptation is to cling to the status quo – protect our turf.  But the status quo will pit us against other professionals, third party payers, our patients, and even ourselves. If we do not solve these dilemmas, they will be solved for us. If we do not write the stories, they will be written without us. If we do not lead, we will be forced to follow.

I cannot keep from wondering what time will do…                                                                         and I wonder how far away from yourself you will go.

A very special teacher once conveyed these words to me. She understood that life’s living will weather anyone and would invariably change me. Even so, I can steer back toward my true self – the real me – by making a difference in the life of someone else.  No profession facilitates this journey more effectively than the healing arts. And there is no equivalent in the healing arts to the calling of physician.

Individuals we can be great. But together we can be greater.  We can positively affect people’s lives in a dramatic way and on a grand scale if we commit to our shared values, reconnect, and work together. It is not only possible. It is our inherent duty.

And we all win.

cards win ncaa

Note: This article was first published as the Greater Louisville Medical Society President’s eVoiceJuly 2013

eVoice pic

Patrick Murphy, MD, MMM is President of the Greater Louisville Medical Society 2013-14.  Dr. Murphy’s blog is The Painful Truth. He can be found on TWITTER  @jamespmurphymd.  His President’s eVoice and other communications & videos can be accessed at the Greater Louisville Medical Society website. 

View Dr. Murphy’s remarks at the Greater Louisville Medical Society’s Presidents’ Celebration May 19, 2013  http://vimeo.com/68703810

ARE WE IN AGREEMENT?

…One Pain Specialist’s Take on the Controlled Substances Prescriber-Patient Agreement 

 me and c arm

With all of the information and misinformation about pain medicines, addiction, and prescription drug abuse, I thought it might be useful to publish a sample of what a “full-bodied” patient-prescriber agreement looks like. More and more states are requiring these for ongoing treatment with powerful medications that have a substantial potential for abuse (i.e. “controlled substances”). Although this version may not be best for everyone (some may be longer, some shorter), my pain management office uses a document similar to this.

So if you have a little time on your hands and want to know what goes into these agreements, here’s my take on what a thorough prescriber-patient agreement looks like.

 cs agree pic

 

INTRODUCTION:

I understand controlled substances medications (i.e. opioid pain medications, tranquilizers, etc.) have a potential for harm and are therefore closely controlled by the local, state and federal governments. I understand that any medical treatment is initially a trial, with the goal of treatment being to improve my quality of life and my ability to function and/or work. My progress will be assessed periodically to determine the benefits of continued treatment. Continued use is dependent on whether my prescribing provider and I believe that the medication usage benefits me. These drugs can be useful, but have high potential for misuse and are therefore closely regulated. This agreement will help my healthcare provider and me and comply with controlled substance regulations. I agree to use opioids (morphine-like drugs) as part of my treatment plan. The success of my treatment depends on trust, honesty and understanding of how opioids are used. I understand that violation of any part of this agreement may result in this medication being discontinued, as well as termination of my relationship with my provider. I agree to the following conditions:

safe

SECURITY OF THE MEDICATIONS:

I am responsible for keeping my pain medications in a safe and secure place, such as a locked cabinet or safe. I am expected to protect my medications. If my medication is stolen, I will report this to my local police department and obtain a stolen item report. I will also report the stolen medication to my physician. I agree that if my medications are lost, misplaced, stolen, or if I use them up sooner than prescribed, my physician may choose not to replace my medications.  I understand that this opioid medication is strictly for me. I will never give away my medications or sell them to others, because it may endanger that person’s health and is against the law.

FOLLOWING DIRECTIONS:

Unless directed to by my prescriber, I will not alter my medication in any way, and I will take my medication whole. My medication will not be broken, chewed, crushed, injected, or snorted. I am responsible for my opioid medications. I will not allow my medications to be damaged.  I will take my medication exactly as instructed and prescribed. I know that any change in dosage or directions must be approved by my licensed provider. I am responsible for taking the medication in the doses prescribed and for keeping track of the amount remaining. I will not take more than is prescribed.

TIME-LIMITED USE FOR ACUTE CONDITIONS:

I understand that a controlled substance used to treat an acute medical complaint is for time-limited use. I will discontinue the use of the controlled substance when the condition requiring the controlled substance use has resolved.

WHEN OTHER CONDITIONS OR SYMPTOMS ARISE:

I will notify my healthcare provider of side effects that continue or are severe or impair me in any way. I will notify Pain Center by the next business day if I need to visit another physician or need to visit an emergency room due to pain or if I become pregnant.

I agree to not request or accept a controlled substance medication from any other prescriber or individual while I am a patient at Pain Center. However, if another licensed provider, after being made aware of my Pain Center Agreement, still feels it is in my best interest to administer or prescribe a controlled substance for me, I will notify Pain Center by phone by the next business day. I will inform all of my healthcare providers of all medications I am taking, including herbal remedies. I understand that medications, including over-the-counter non-prescription medications can interact with opioid medications and be dangerous.

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NO ILLICIT SUBSTANCES:

I will not use any illicit substances such as cocaine, marijuana, etc. I understand that the use of alcohol together with opioid medications is dangerous and can lead to death. I will promptly inform my Pain Center prescriber if I use or intend to use any of these substances, including alcohol.

KEEPING APPOINTMENTS:

It is my responsibility to schedule appointments for the next refill. I will communicate fully and honestly with my prescriber about my pain level and my activities. I understand that in order to more thoroughly evaluate my plan of care as it pertains to the use of controlled substances, I may have additional visit scheduled at my provider’s discretion. I will keep all my Pain Center appointments.  If I must reschedule, I will notify Pain Center prior to my scheduled time.  If an appointment for a prescription refill is missed, I will request another appointment as soon as possible. I know that immediate or emergency appointments to address medication issues may not be available. However, I understand that I am allowed to seek the services of another healthcare provider in the event of an emergency or acute situation.

REFILLS:

Refills will not be made as an “emergency.” They will be made at planned clinic visits, during regular business hours. I will not expect any medications will be prescribed during the evening or on weekends. I do not expect prescriptions to be written in advance due to vacations, meetings or other commitments. I do not expect my prescriptions to be mailed. I expect that a government issued picture ID will be required to pick up prescriptions.

friendly-pharmacist1

ONE DESIGNATED PHARMACY:

I will designate and use only one pharmacy for all of my controlled substance medications and give the Pain Center full permission to communicate with the pharmacist about my medical care and medications.  Unless I have been given authorization by Pain Center, controlled substance prescriptions can only be filled by a pharmacy in the same state as the Pain Center, even if I am a resident of another state. I will allow my prescriber and his or her associates to send a copy of this agreement to my other healthcare providers and/or to the pharmacy where I obtain my prescriptions.

Urine Sample

DRUG TESTING: 

My prescriber may perform drug testing on me. I agree that I may be called at any time to come in to the clinic for a count of all my remaining medications and/or a drug screen and I agree to come that day. I agree to be responsible for any costs this may incur. If requested to provide a urine sample or other type of sample if necessary. If I decide not to provide a urine sample, I understand that my prescriber may change my treatment plan. This might include discontinuation of my opioid medications or complete termination of our patient-prescriber relationship. The presence of a non-prescribed drug or illicit drug in my urine may be cause for termination of our relationship.

SHARING INFORMATION:

I agree to allow my healthcare provider to contact any healthcare professional, family member, pharmacy, legal authority, or regulatory agency to obtain or provide information about my care or actions if the he or she feels it is necessary. I will allow my prescriber and his or her associates to receive information from any health care provider or pharmacist about use or possible misuse of alcohol and other drugs. I will allow my prescriber and and his or her associates to contact my family and friends to monitor my conditions.  Furthermore, I consent to a criminal background check.

PRIMARY CARE PROVIDER RELATIONSHIP:

I have and will maintain at all times a relationship with a primary care provider and keep him or her informed of all medications I am taking. I agree to and understand the requirement that I have an annual preventive health screening and physical exam by my primary care provider. If recommended, I will see a specialist and/or complete a screening exam to help determine whether I am developing an addiction or psychological illness.  I agree to be responsible for any costs this may incur.

FUNCTIONAL GOALS:

I understand that the main treatment goal is to improve my ability to function. I understand that in general, it is unrealistic for patients to expect complete resolution of their chronic pain with any specific treatment or combination of therapies. I understand that it is important to have a conversation with my provider about my treatment plan and set realistic goals for improvement. I pledge to work together with my provider towards improving my pain control and achieving specific functional goals. I understand that functional goals might include increasing physical activity level, resuming a job/hobby or improving the quality of sleep.

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AN “EXIT STRATEGY”:

I understand the concept of an “exit strategy” regarding these medications. I agree that if any of the following goals are not attained this may be evidence of a failure of opioid therapy and discontinuation of some or all of my medications could be the most appropriate plan: (1) meaningful pain control; or (2) acceptable level of function; or (3) tolerable side-effects; or (4) stable and acceptable mental health and behavior: or (5) compliance the plan of care, laws, and regulations.

PATIENT EDUCATION:

I acknowledge that I have been educated on the following matters through verbal or written counseling: (1) proper use; (2) impact on driving and work safety; (3) effect of use during pregnancy; (4) potential for overdose and appropriate response to overdose; (5) safe storage of controlled substances; and (6) proper disposal.

OFF-LABEL USE OF MEDICATION:

All prescription drugs in the US have a label approved by the FDA.  This label provides an indication and dosage for the drug, but neither physician nor patient is legally bound to follow them.  Studies cannot reliably evaluate all the combination treatments in complicated, difficult-to-treat conditions. I understand that my treatment may include “off label” use of medications. 

DISCONTINUATION OF CARE:

I understand that my violation of any of the above conditions may result in re-evaluation of my treatment plan and discontinuation of my medication. I could be gradually taken off these medications or even discharged from the clinic. If my violation involves obtaining controlled substances from another individual, as described above, I may also be reported to my physician, medical facilities and other authorities, including the police.

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I HEREBY AGREE:

I have read this agreement or it has been explained to me by the Pain Center practitioners and/or staff. If I am not currently receiving controlled substances from Pain Center, this agreement does not apply.  However, I understand that this agreement immediately becomes effective if in the future I do receive controlled substances.  I fully understand the consequences of violating this agreement.  I have been explained the risks and potential benefits of these therapies, including, but not limited to, psychological addiction, physical dependence, withdrawal and over dosage. All of my questions regarding the treatment of pain with opioids have been answered to my satisfaction. I hereby agree to participate in the opioid medication therapy and acknowledge that I have received this document.

Disclaimer: This is not legal advice.  This is not medical advice.  This is my personal opinion and has not been endorsed by any individual or entity.  All persons should consult his or her own legal counsel and/or health care providers for advice and guidance.

job-reference-check

First Do No Harm: The Indiana Healthcare Providers Guide to the Safe, Effective Management of Chronic Non-Terminal Pain, Version1.0  http://www.in.gov/bitterpill/docs/First_Do_No_Harm_V_1_0.pdf

Sample Controlled Substance Agreement Developed by The Greater Louisville Medical Society http://kbml.ky.gov/substance-abuse/Pages/default.aspx

Kentucky Board of Medical Licensure, House Bill 1 Ordinary Regulations Effective March 4, 2013 http://kbml.ky.gov/hb1/Pages/House-Bill-1-Ordinary-Regulations.aspx

Medical Licensing Board of Indiana, Emergency Rule (Pain Medications) http://www.in.gov/pla/files/Emergency_Rules_Adopted_10.24.2013.pdf

Indiana Pain FINAL RULE (Effective November 1, 2014):
http://www.in.gov/legislative/iac/20141105-IR-844140289FRA.xml.html

 

me close up

James Patrick Murphy, MD, MMM attended medical school at the University of Louisville, interned in Psychiatry at the San Diego Naval Hospital, studied at the Naval Aerospace Medical Institute, and later served as a Naval Flight Surgeon onboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Enterprise.  He returned to Louisville for residency training in Anesthesiology after which he completed a Pain Medicine Fellowship at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. Dr. Murphy is board-certified in Anesthesiology, Pain Medicine, and Addiction Medicine. He is President of the Greater Louisville Medical Society, Medical Director of Murphy Pain Center, Assistant Clinical Professor at the University of Louisville School of Medicine, and serves on the board of the International Association for Pain and Chemical Dependency. In May 2013 Dr. Murphy earned a Master of Medical Management degree from the University of Southern California Marshall School of Business.

Dr. Murphy’s blog is The Painful Truth. He can be found on TWITTER by searching @jamespmurphymd. His President’s eVoice and other communications & videos can be accessed at the Greater Louisville Medical Society website.

OPIOID EMAIL RECAP

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The premier offering of “Optimal Prescribing Is Our Inherent Duty” concluded on Sunday, February 9th.  I plan on having more to say… soon.

For now, I thought it worthwhile to share the three emails I sent to our staff, participants, and faculty each evening.

It was a sincere privilege to serve with the OPIOID team.

OPIOID picture

FEBRUARY 7, 2014 – DAY ONE

Dear all OPIOID’ers,

Well, day ONE was a great success. All ten participants were energetic and focused. Our GLMS staff was superb. After an overview by yours truly, Dr. Paul Sloan gave a thorough review of pharmacology and guidelines. Then Detective Beth Ruoff did a fantastic job explaining the diversion issues facing prescribers.  Dr. Boz Tabler educated us on the science behind addiction. Lastly, Dr. Heather Tluczek joined the team and facilitated two earnest and brutally honest Healing Place peer mentors offering a gut wrenching account of the toll addiction exacts.

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The staff of The Healing Place was great. The room was perfectly outfitted. And the food was delicious.  And we ran on time all day! Thanks to Dr. Mary Helen Davis and Dr. Mark Boswell for stopping by for support…  the day before they present.

Tomorrow (Saturday) we are at the Greater Louisville Medical Society headquarters for DAY TWO. More great lectures, discussions, and experiential learning!  It’s happening! More later…

– Pat

old school now

FEBRUARY 8 – DAY TWO

Dear Friends of OPIOID,

Day TWO has come and gone… and what a day it was!

mhd

We convened bright and early at the Old Medical School Building (GLMS headquarters). After some camaraderie and a hot breakfast, Dr. Mary Helen Davis took us through the inner workings of KASPER, the governmental process involved in making policies, and finished with a discussion on physician motivation in the age of regulatory expansion.

boz

We then had what, to the casual observer, must have looked like group therapy – led by Dr. Boswell Tabler.  I believe this was another major breakthrough moment in the course, as the participants began to open up with personal accounts. At the end, all seemed to be fully motivated to make the changes necessary to be successful.

boz and ken

Then Dr. Ken Kirsh gave an extremely thorough review of the interface between pain and psychological issues. This was followed by Dr. Tabler’s interactive discussion on psychiatric treatment strategies.

After breaking for lunch, Dr. Mark Boswell had us enthralled by his categorical run down of the different types of challenging pain patients. He followed this with a lecture on how to screen for psychological pathology in our patient population.

Then it was on to “Pain Management Meets Speed Dating.” Dr. Heather Tluczek, along with Dr. Patrick Myers and seven other gifted actors posed as various types of challenging pain patient – allowing the course participants private one-on-one mock interviews.  This was a fast-paced, exhausting, and enlightening experiential learning exercise. Everyone had a good time and learned something about themselves.

Tomorrow Dave Hopkins will get us up to speed on KASPER. Then I will be bringing it home with a thorough run down of Kentucky’s laws and regulations. We will conclude by getting familiar with some “tools” and memory aids in order to help the participants apply their new skills efficiently in their own practice setting.

This is going great! Our GLMS staff is fabulous. Our OPIOID faculty is superb. I almost don’t want it to end.

– Pat

really dave and boz

FEBRUARY 9 – DAY THREE

Dear OPIOID friends,

In May of 2012, just after Kentucky passed House Bill One on the last day of a Special Legislative Session, the thought of having a comprehensive educational course for prescribers took root. Well, today that sapling idea bore fruit.

The inaugural OPIOID course concluded today around 1:00 pm. It was three days packed with lectures, group dynamic work, testimonials, didactics, theatre, poetry, and focused engaged effort by ten pioneering participants.

dave K

Today we had breakfast together then nourished our minds with 90 minutes of Dave Kasper, err, I mean Dave Hopkins – the KASPER director. He loaded our heads with vital information about our state’s electronic prescription monitoring program. I then led a discussion on drug screens and compliance monitoring.  During our final two hours we poured over the Kentucky pain regulations in detail and learned strategies on how to incorporate the rules effectively into our daily practice routines.

What was most gratifying to me was seeing how our participants (now to be rightly known as our “partners”) remained focused and underwent a metamorphosis of sorts. But in reality, I don’t believe they were changed in any way by the course. Instead, I believe OPIOID may have rekindled a spark in each of them that was already there – only perhaps a bit beaten down by the regulatory grind. I know I was inspired by what happen over these past three days.

I am grateful to so many people and in the coming weeks I plan on communicating that message in other formats. For now, let me just say that everyone who participated – staff, volunteers, faculty, students, and even our impromptu professor GLMS security guard “Cory” felt something special had happened over the past three days.

…and something special has begun.

Yours in earnest gratitude,

– Pat

juggle dr m

*still juggling…

patient

practice

community

*P.S. You had to be there.

3 balls

 

James Patrick Murphy, MD, MMM  is President of the Greater Louisville Medical Society.

 

NIDA & the Facts on Marijuana

The National Institute on Drug Abuse Offers the Facts on Marijuana

NIDA1

From the website:

http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/marijuana

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Marijuana…

Use is rampant:

“Marijuana is the most common illicit drug used in the United States.”

brain damage

Has a powerful effect on the brain:

“Marijuana overactivates the endocannabinoid system, causing the high and other effects that users experience. These include distorted perceptions, impaired coordination, difficulty with thinking and problem solving, and disrupted learning and memory.”

Interferes with successful lives:

“Heavy marijuana users generally report lower life satisfaction, poorer mental and physical health, relationship problems, and less academic and career success.”

Damages the brains of young people:

“Research from different areas is converging on the fact that regular marijuana use by young people can have long-lasting negative impact on the structure and function of their brains.”

Permanently lowers IQ:

“A recent study of marijuana users who began using in adolescence revealed a profound deficit in connections between brain areas responsible for learning and memory. And a large prospective study (following individuals across time) showed that people who began smoking marijuana heavily in their teens lost as much as 8 points in IQ between age 13 and age 38; importantly, the lost cognitive abilities were not restored in those who quit smoking marijuana as adults.”

Causes heart disease:

“Marijuana raises heart rate by 20-100 percent shortly after smoking; this effect can last up to 3 hours. In one study, it was estimated that marijuana users have a 4.8-fold increase in the risk of heart attack in the first hour after smoking the drug.” 

car wreck

Causes car wrecks:

“A recent analysis of data from several studies found that marijuana use more than doubles a driver’s risk of being in an accident.”

Damages the lungs:

“People who smoke marijuana frequently but do not smoke tobacco have more health problems and miss more days of work than nonsmokers, mainly because of respiratory illnesses.”

Causes psychiatric illness:

“A series of large prospective studies also showed a link between marijuana use and later development of psychosis. Associations have also been found between marijuana use and other mental health problems, such as depression, anxiety, suicidal thoughts among adolescents, and personality disturbances.”

fetus

Damages babies:

“Marijuana use during pregnancy is associated with increased risk of neurobehavioral problems in babies. Consequences for the child may include problems with attention, memory, and problem solving.”

Medical-Cannabis

Is NOT a legitimate medicine:

“The FDA requires carefully conducted studies in large numbers of patients (hundreds to thousands) to accurately assess the benefits and risks of a potential medication. To be considered a legitimate medicine, a substance must have well-defined and measureable ingredients that are consistent from one unit (such as a pill or injection) to the next.”

Is definitely addictive:

“Contrary to common belief, marijuana is addictive. Estimates from research suggest that about 9 percent of users become addicted to marijuana; this number increases among those who start young (to about 17 percent, or 1 in 6) and among daily users (to 25-50 percent).”

And is more potent that ever:

“The amount of THC in marijuana samples confiscated by police has been increasing steadily over the past few decades.”

Read more:  http://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/research-reports/marijuana-abuse

drug facts week