The Seven Essentials for Pain Practice Success* …Sailing the Seven C’s

cloudmpc

Success is counted sweetest by those who ne’er succeed.
~Emily Dickinson

You treat chronic pain? Thank goodness someone does.
~My physician colleagues … on numerous occasions

I have treated chronic pain in a variety of practice settings, large and small, for almost thirty years. It has not always been easy. But I have found that success in this specialty is possible when the practice foundation consists of seven basic elements:

Cost-effective
Cooperation
Compliance
Consensus
Culture
Cause
Care

Chronic pain is not an exotic clinical niche. It is a chronic illness and should be approached step-wise as one would approach other chronic illnesses:

(1) Gather information;
(2) Make a diagnosis;
(3) Implement a plan of care;
(4) Assess the results; and
(5) Make adjustments.

A physician is generally comfortable with this paradigm when it applies to caring for an individual pain patient. However, regardless of one’s clinical confidence, when the practice’s primary mission is to treat chronic pain, overriding concerns about economic viability, community safety, and regulatory scrutiny become major stressors for a physician. More than just a paradigm is needed.

By embracing The Seven Essentials for Pain Practice Success a healthcare organization of any size or complexity can meet this need and provide quality pain care that is valued by the patient and professionally satisfying to the provider.

The Seven Essentials for Pain Practice Success

1. COST-EFFECTIVE

There’s no escaping the fact that healthcare costs are prodigious and resources are finite. Care providers may feel compelled to offer expensive treatments and order technologically advanced tests, regardless of the cost, out of a desire to provide the best care possible. But “best care” is not equivalent to “most-expensive care.” The success of any pain care practice is dependent upon use of resources – of the patient and the practice- in a manner that optimizes value.

2. COOPERATION

Do not tell patients what you will do to them. Instead, figure out how you can work with them. Providing care in a climate of draconian pain regulations, dogmatic practice guidelines, and dearth of evidence to support treatment options, is optimized by patient-practitioner partnerships. Success requires positive outcomes for the: (1) patient, (2) caregiver, and (3) community. If any of these three stakeholders have bad outcomes, failure is the sum total. With cooperation and teamwork, success is more likely achieved.

3. COMPLIANCE

Be a follower. In addition to an ever-increasing database of clinical guidelines, there are numerous regulations and statutes governing how healthcare providers may treat pain, particularly when treatment involves controlled substances. Some of the rules are federal statutes that apply universally. Other rules are only specific to individual states or communities. Rules governing pain care delivery may not necessarily reflect the best clinical practice, but are usually based upon sound principles. Search for the reason behind the rule. But if all else fails, go ahead and “teach to the test.” Compliance is mandatory. Even if you think “outside the box” do not act outside the box. Know the rules and follow the rules.

4. CONSENSUS

A successful pain practice must agree on how they will operate. Do some providers allow early refills, while others will not? Are some quick to discharge a patient who has an abnormal drug screen, while others give second chances? How often do we drug screen? Do we prescribe drugs on the first visit? Through honest communication the group must reach a consensus on “our way” of doing things.

5. CULTURE

Every organization has its own culture. A successful pain practice understands its culture, knows its weaknesses and knows its strengths. For example, if the group’s dominant culture is intuitive, then it needs safeguards (i.e. objective and detail-oriented policies and procedures) to focus on specifics. Success requires that individuals not only understand their roles, but also are willing to perform in a manner that supports the group’s dominant culture.

6. CAUSE

Successful pain practices know their cause, their mission, the reason the practice exists. Even the most mundane task can be passionately undertaken when team members understand how their actions contribute to the cause. In addition, successful practice managers make sure team members feel appreciated for their efforts.

7. CARE

Caring is the foundation for success. In all decisions, successful pain practices first ask: “Is it in the patient’s best interest?” Beyond that, every human encountered by the organization -patients, family members, hospital administrators, government regulators, insurance brokers, pharmaceutical representatives, colleagues, etc.- is worthy of dignity, respect, and care. The “golden rule” always comes before the rule of gold. Remember that no one cares how much you know until they know how much you care.

Each of the seven essentials for pain practice success is vital. Ignore one and the organization is on thin ice. Embrace them all and the practice, regardless of its size, can be on economical, clinical and ethical solid ground.

Then no one will have to “thank goodness” for what you do.
Instead, you can be thanked for the goodness that you do.

That is sweet success.

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we are great

https://vimeo.com/channels/glms/68703810

James Patrick Murphy, MD, MMM is a Past President of the Greater Louisville Medical Society, Medical Director of Murphy Pain Center, and an Assistant Clinical Professor at the University of Louisville School of Medicine. He is board-certified in Pain Medicine, Anesthesiology, and Addiction Medicine and has a Master of Medical Management from the USC Marshall School of Business.

*Note: This article was originally titled: The Five Essentials for Pain Practice Success. “Cost-effectiveness” was added on July 30, 2015; “Cooperation” was added on September 30, 2015; each prompting a change in the title.

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Treating Pain With Truth

collage

Then you will know the truth, and the truth will set you free.
~ John 8:32 (NIV)

…Pain free?

Confluential Truth blog posts address various issues, and many share a healthcare theme. Often the focus is on chronic pain. The following collection of Confluential Truth offers my views on how chronic pain may be effectively and safely treated, especially when the treatment involves controlled substances. Each essay is like a chapter in a mini-textbook about treating chronic pain. They are offered here hoping to provide insight into improving quality of life for pain sufferers and pain care providers.

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PROLOGUE:  The Algiatrist – To set the tone, a poem about treating pain and being “useful.”

INTRO ALGIATRIST https://jamespmurphymd.com/2013/11/22/the-algiatrist

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CHAPTER ONE:  The Dream of Pain Care – A transcript of my address to the physicians and staff of Norton Healthcare – the what, why & how. If you only have time to read one essay, this is the one.

1 wolfe https://jamespmurphymd.com/2014/04/25/the-dream-of-pain-care-enough-to-cope-the-seventeenth-r-dietz-wolfe-memorial-lecture

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CHAPTER TWO:  Pathway to Partnership, Part 1 (KY) – Here is how we do it in Kentucky when we do it right.2 ky path  https://jamespmurphymd.com/2015/02/13/pathway-to-partnership

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CHAPTER THREE:  Pathway to Partnership, Part 2 (IN) – Here is how we do it in Indiana when we do it right.

Screen Shot 2015-07-17 at 12.33.44 PM

https://jamespmurphymd.com/2015/03/29/pathway-to-partnership-part-ii-in

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CHAPTER FOUR:  Are We In Agreement? – Expectations, edification and enlightenment result from properly implemented patient-physician “agreements.”

agree

https://jamespmurphymd.com/2014/02/19/are-we-in-agreement

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CHAPTER FIVE:  Treating Pain Patients Like Addicts – There is ample overlap between optimal treatment for addiction and optimal treatment for chronic pain. Utilizing this knowledge can enhance the effectiveness and mitigate the risks inherent to treating chronic pain with controlled substances.5 tx like addicts https://jamespmurphymd.com/2014/11/21/treating-pain-patients-like-addicts

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CHAPTER SIX:  Basic Pain Care Certification – It’s a sad fact the number of deaths associated with drug overdose is roughly equivalent to the number of motor vehicle fatalities. Imagine how many might die on our roads if, instead of a driver’s license, all you needed to drive a car was a prescription from a doctor. Now, imagine how many less might die of drug overdose if you had earn a “license” to use controlled substances…

4.5 pain care certhttps://jamespmurphymd.com/2014/08/06/basic-pain-care-certification

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CHAPTER SEVEN:  Strength in Numbers – Successful chronic pain treatment involves: (a) medical care; (b) counseling; and (c) a support system. Find all three and you have probably found…

6 str in num https://jamespmurphymd.com/2014/07/02/strength-in-numbers

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CHAPTER EIGHT:  It’s Only Words – Over the years I have given many presentations concerning medication management for chronic pain. Often I have said that if there is only one concept I want the group to take away it’s that “addiction” and “physical dependence” are not the same thing.

8 words https://jamespmurphymd.com/2014/04/03/its-only-words

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CHAPTER NINE:  Talking Trash – We spend much time worrying about the acquisition of pain medications but too often don’t know what to do with them when we are done.

7 talk trash     https://jamespmurphymd.com/2014/07/21/talking-trash

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CHAPTER TEN:  Is There Method To This March Madness? – Too often our focus is on a specific drug, when in reality the culprit is the disease.

9 march madnesshttps://jamespmurphymd.com/2014/03/18/is-there-method-to-this-march-madness

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EPILOGUE:  Proclaim Pain Care Providers Day! – Don’t just provide great pain care… Proclaim it!

10 PCPD https://jamespmurphymd.com/2015/01/22/proclaim-pain-care-providers-day

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westminster podium

James Patrick Murphy, MD, MMM is Chair of the Board of Governors -and Immediate Past President- of the Greater Louisville Medical Society, Medical Director of Murphy Pain Center, and an Assistant Clinical Professor at the University of Louisville School of Medicine. Dr. Murphy contributes to numerous publications, has presented before national and international audiences, and consults with a wide spectrum of agencies and individuals regarding pain, addiction, and the future of healthcare in our country. He is board-certified in Pain Medicine, Anesthesiology, and Addiction Medicine.

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Pathway to Partnership, Part II (IN)

THE CHRONIC PAIN PATIENT’S GUIDE TO INDIANA’S REGULATIONS  Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 2.19.10 AM

No man is an island, Entire of itself, Every man is a piece of the continent, A part of the main. – John Donne

The poet, John Donne, knew it. Every Hoosier pain patient and Hoosier pain care provider should take it to heart. No patient or provider is an island. And pain care is best when there is a partnership between the patient and provider. The Pathway to Partnership If you are treated for pain in the Hoosier State the pathway to partnership with your physician passes through Indiana’s pain regulations. Indiana’s entire southern border is Kentucky. And when it comes to patient responsibilities, Kentucky’s pain regulations have much in common with Indiana’s. Therefore, Hoosier patients can begin preparation for their Indiana chronic pain care evaluation by reading my article: Pathway to Partnership, Part I (KY) – The Chronic Pain Patient’s Guide to Kentucky’s Regulations. Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 2.25.49 AM Available at: https://jamespmurphymd.com/2015/02/13/pathway-to-partnership Particular to Indiana is the Hoosier state’s emphasis on medication dosing limits that trigger mandatory compliance with the regulations. Calculating these dosing limits can be quite confusing and, frankly, patients are not responsible for knowing them. Prescribers are. But to be a good “partner” with your prescriber, you should at least become familiar with these dosing limits. Later in this article I will summarize. But first, in order to hold up your end of the partnership, here are ten items you can prepare:

  1. Your past medical history
  2. Your pertinent medical records
  3. An accurate medication list
  4. Any substance abuse history
  5. Your social and family history
  6. Any other medical issues
  7. Educate yourself for proper informed consent
  8. Your current level of function
  9. Your treatment goals
  10. Complete questionnaires & mental health screens

These ten items are discussed in detail in Pathway to Partnership, Part I (KY) – The Chronic Pain Patient’s Guide to Kentucky’s Regulations. Prepare as described above you will be well on your way to becoming a great partner in your care. As your partnership continues, expect to have contact with your physician on a regular basis and even randomly to:

      1. Review your progress with your treatment plan;
      2. Review the goals of your plan; and
      3. Review expectations (i.e. attending therapy, counseling, tests, etc.)

Insider Information As a partner, you are entitled to some “insider” information. Here it is… A new section of Indiana’s regulations contain a lengthy explanation of what prescribers must consider when ordering drug screens. By doing so, this section offers insight into appropriate patient behavior. The following list, summarized from the regulations, offers an insider’s look at what Indiana expects of a pain patient: In determining whether a drug monitoring test…is medically necessary, the physician shall consider” if the patient has:

      • Taken the meds as prescribed?
      • Taken more meds than allowed?
      • Given or sold meds to anyone?
      • Benefitted from the meds?
      • Taken any other drugs – legal or illegal?
      • Been honest and up front about past drug use?
      • Tried to get early refills?
      • Lost meds? Had them stolen?
      • Had an abnormal INSPECT state prescription report?
      • Failed a drug screen?
      • Been intoxicated?
      • Been acting aggressive, depressed, anxious, etc.?
      • Been diagnosed with a psychiatric condition?
      • Demanded certain specific meds?
      • Had a major illness? Pregnancy? Hospitalization?
      • Been resistant to any changes in the care plan?
      • Refused or failed to follow through with exams/tests?
      • Just not done well overall?

Bottom line: Be honest, up front and “transparent.” No one likes surprises. A good partnership is all about trust and communication. Understand what your treatment agreement says and live up to it. cs agree pic Dosing Limits Now, about those dosing limits… As I said, it can be confusing, but you should try to understand the concepts and discuss them with your prescriber. Not all pain prescriptions are subject to the Indiana regulations. Therefore, it is important to understand the dosing limits that trigger mandatory compliance. These limits are dependent upon: (1) the dose, (2) the quantity and (3) the duration. The Morphine Equivalent Dose (“MED”) is basically how strong your medication would be if it were to be substituted for morphine. This is very important to INDIANA regulatory agencies. I highly recommend you learn how to calculate your MED. Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 10.47.08 AM Calculating the MED Step ONE: Calculate the MED for one pill Determine the dose of morphine that would be equal to one of your pills using a standard conversion table (For example: a FIVE mgm hydrocodone pill is the same as a FIVE mgm morphine pill; but a FIVE mgm oxycodone pill would be the same as a 7.5 mgm morphine pill). Indiana officials recommend this website for help with making this determination: The online opioid calculator from GlobalRPH http://www.globalrph.com/narcoticonv.htm Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 2.30.15 AM Step TWO: Calculate your DAILY MED Once you have converted your pill to its “morphine equivalent,” simply add up the maximum number of pills your prescription allows you to take in a day and multiply this number by the morphine equivalent (MED) you determined in step one. (Number of pills per day) x MED/one pill = Daily MED For example: Since a FIVE mgm hydrocodone pill is equal to a FIVE mgm morphine pill, the daily MED of someone taking THREE of these hydrocodone pills per day would be: 5 mgm x 3 pills per day = 15 mgm MED Here are some common ORALLY prescribed opioids that compare to a MED of 15: Hydrocodone (oral) 15 mgm/day = 15 mgm of morphine (oral) Oxycodone(oral) 10 mgm/day = 15 mgm of morphine (oral) Oxymorphone (oral) 5 mgm/day = 15 mgm of morphine (oral) Codeine (oral) mgm/day = 15 mgm of morphine (oral) Hydromorphone (oral) 3.75 mgm/day = 15 mgm of morphine (oral) Tramadol (oral) 150 = 15 mgm of morphine (oral) Note: MED greater than SIXTY If you are on a treatment regimen with a morphine equivalent dose of more than SIXTY (60) MED, the physician may require you to have an evaluation by a specialist. According to the regulations, your physician must explain to you that there is an increased risk of adverse outcomes, including death, when your daily MED is greater than SIXTY. So now that you understand the MED, you are ready to look at the DOSING LIMITS that trigger compliance with the regulations. DOSE, QUANTITY & DURATION When any of the following conditions are met, your physician (and you) must comply with the Indiana pain regulations.

      1. DOSE & DURATION >15 MED for >3 months

DAILY MED greater than FIFTEEN for DURATION of more than three consecutive months Or…

      1. QUANTITY & DURATION >60 pills for >3 months

More than SIXTY opioid pills per month for DURATION of more than THREE consecutive months Or…

      1. PATCHES > 3 months

Any opioid skin patches (e.g., fentanyl or buprenorphine), regardless of the dose or quantity, for DURATION of more than THREE consecutive months Or…

      1. Hydrocodone-Only Extended Release

Any hydrocodone-only extended release medication that is NOT in an “abuse deterrent” form, regardless of the DOSE, QUANTITY or DURATION Or…

      1. TRAMADOL (My advice) >150 mgm for >3 months

Actual language in the regulations state: “If the patient’s tramadol dose reaches a morphine equivalent dose of more than sixty (60) milligrams per day for more than three (3) consecutive months.” This tramadol dose limit seems to be overly generous when compared to other MED dosing limits. A SIXTY (60) MGM MED of tramadol is in the range of 300 to 600 mgm of tramadol. Considering that the maximum therapeutic dose for tramadol is only 400 mgm per day, one could potentially exceed the safe upper limit of tramadol and still not exceed Indiana’s dosing limit. This seems to be inconsistent with the regulation’s other opioid dosing limits. My advice: Since 150 mgm of tramadol is equivalent to a FIFTEEN (15) MED, I believe it is more consistent with the other Indiana opioid dosage limits to consider TRAMADOL greater than 150 mgm/day for more than THREE consecutive months as the dosage limit congruent with other opioid dosage limits. Reference: The online opioid calculator from GlobalRPH http://www.globalrph.com/narcoticonv.htm Wait!!! There are EXEMPTIONS !!! Regardless of the dose, quantity or duration, the Indiana pain regulations do not apply to these patients: (1) With a terminal condition (2) Residing in a licensed health facility (3) Enrolled in a licensed hospice program (4) Enrolled in a licensed palliative care program microphone 5 In summary, patients and physicians should travel the pathway to partnership together. Patients can do their part by (1) preparing for the clinical visits, (2) understanding and adhering to their treatment agreements, and (3) educating themselves about risks, side-effects, and legal aspects of their care. It is a real challenge to treat chronic pain in this day and age. Your physician needs your help. Will you leave it all up to your physician? Or will you be a good partner, heeding the words of the poet DonneAnd therefore never send to know For whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee.  * podium thumbs up James Patrick Murphy, MD, MMM is Chair of the Board of Governors -and Immediate Past President- of the Greater Louisville Medical Society, Medical Director of Murphy Pain Center, and an Assistant Clinical Professor at the University of Louisville School of Medicine. Dr. Murphy contributes to numerous publications, has presented before national and international audiences, and consults with a wide spectrum of agencies and individuals regarding pain, addiction, and the future of healthcare in our country. He is board-certified in Pain Medicine, Anesthesiology, and Addiction Medicine. * References and links pertaining to this article are provided in the comments. * This unofficial summary is my personal opinion. A full, official version of the final rule should be consulted for compliance purposes at: http://www.in.gov/legislative/iac/20141105-IR-844140289FRA.xml.html The Indian State Medical Association also has a summary available at: http://www.ismanet.org/pdf/legal/IndianaPainManagementPrescribingFinalRuleSummary.pdf no harm And if you really want to explore the Indiana pain regulations in detail, there is no better source than the online guide: First Do No Harm, The Indiana Healthcare Providers Guide to the Safe, Effective Management of Chronic Non-Terminal Pain. http://www.in.gov/bitterpill/docs/First_Do_No_Harm_V_1_0.pdf * Hey Hoosier! Who’s your partner? handshake_between_doctor_and_patient_with_the_sky_background_1341168865 * * *

National Pain Care Providers Day

meryl

Every dog has his day, right?

In our culture, groups, individuals, and even inanimate objects are frequently honored with their very own special twenty-four hours. These days of recognition give us pauses to examine their meanings and further their causes.

But there’s a compassionate and deserving group of people who have not yet made the list…the caring people who treat our pain. 

For now, National Pain Care Providers Day is only a dream.

It doesn’t exist.

It should.
It can.
And it will…with your help.

National Pain Care Providers Day
March 20, 2015

npcpd hands screen

It’s time to recognize all who generously and selflessly strive to alleviate suffering. This includes physicians, dentists, nurses, therapists, emergency responders, trainers, masseuses, pharmacists, caregivers, mothers and anyone who gives of her or himself to ease pain.

Why is National Pain Care Providers Day necessary?

Pain is universal. It is the most common medical complaint. There is no escaping it. Pain touches every life. And as our population continues to age, pain is occurring in epidemic proportion.

Pain care is sometimes simple and sometimes extremely complicated. Caregivers can feel tremendous pressure from government agencies, police, lawyers, administrators, addicts, abusers, patients, families, administrators, insurance providers, and the media. As a result, caregivers are too often reduced to feeling “You’re damned if you do and damned if you don’t.”

In reality, they should be praised because of what they do.

Caregivers who persevere deserve our support, gratitude and, at the very least, a day of recognition.

Popular opinions regarding pain care and treatments are evolving rapidly. Taking a special day to spotlight best practices and inspire possibilities would not only bolster the advancement of this vital field of medicine, it would encourage the legions of those who suffer in lonely silence. Less suffering and better lives for all are the goals.

Celebrating National Pain Care Providers Day on March 20, 2015 – the first day of spring – is akin to celebrating hope. From this day forward, the vernal equinox, light overcomes darkness.

RAINBOW SCREEN

So let’s join together and recognize the first day of spring, March 20, 2015, as National Pain Care Providers Day. Let’s make this day special for the special people who treat our pain. Start by sharing your comments and ideas on this blog and/or emailing paincareprovidersday@gmail.com. Pass along the message on social media (Twitter, Facebook, etc.) and contact your civic leaders. Be a vital part of this movement.

Let Hercules himself do what he may,
The cat will mew and dog will have his day.
~ William Shakespeare’s Hamlet

You are the playwright now.
The parchment is blank.
Imagine.
Create.

And celebrate!

National Pain Care Providers Day
March 20, 2015

npcpd screen

 

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Is it the singer or is it the song?

I love music.

I am not what one might call “musical.” I don’t have the pipes of a Whitney Houston (see: The Star Spangled Banner) or the soulfulness of a Bob Dylan (see: Blowing in the Wind), but I appreciate their unique virtuosity.

I am a pain care physician. Pain, like music, is a sensory and emotional experience. I don’t sing or play. I touch and treat.

Sometimes I may hit the perfect note, perform the perfect procedure, compose the perfect plan of care.

Other times, despite being well versed, my plan of care may not strike the right chord. Then creating a pleasant sensory and emotional experience depends upon the passion and conviction with which my care is conducted; my song is sung.

Is it the singer or is it the song?

Is it the caregiver or is it the care given?

Music is not only intertwined with my pain care. It is woven into every aspect of my life, including my Twitter feed.

Begging the question: Is it the tweeter or is it the tweet?

Let’s find out.

For a about a year I have been composing a Twitter message or two per day. Recently, I went back and was able to find forty tweets that were “musical” in some way. It may not be America’s top forty, but I think Casey Kasem would still have been pleased.

casey kasem b and w

There are songs from rock, country, and classical genres; from musicals, commercials, television, and the silver screen. Some are serious; some are silly. Original works, live performances, even parodies.

I now invite you to take a little journey through my musical tweets. Click on the image and the link should take you right to the performance. See if you can guess the song before you link to it. Ponder how it relates to the message. Enjoy the sensory and emotional experience. And decide for yourself…

Is it the tweeter or is it the twuuth* ?

 

* twuuth (definition)

  • noun\ˈtwüth\ the twuuth : the truth in a tweet

 

#40

1 25 oct 13

25 October 2013  How the Ghost Stole Pain Care. Dramatic reading by Phil Ward and music composed by Megan McIver

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/393876826809843712/photo/1

http://vimeo.com/77715467

 

#39

2 21 dec 13

21 December 2013  A Winter’s Solstice

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/414443104792354816?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kh_sckAUkgE&list=PLe1seBFJFklgHIqjjUUUhxZmL_rchZau9

 

#38

3 10 jan 2014

10 January 2014  Act Naturally

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/421697528891854848/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c-07qmTUi9A

 

#37

4 12 jan 2014

12 January 2014 Les Miserables

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/422410734950043648/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HPIos2mXbUE

 

#36

5 26 jan 14

26 January 2014 I’m Only Sleeping

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/427318581399789569/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KAsr-hix9s

 

#35

6 10 feb 14

10 February 2014 The Gold and Beyond

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/433042987648417792?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2hBB4DPw-h4

 

#34

7 12 feb 14

12 February 2014 ABC

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/433632926316515329/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I8GvDLDYhNM

 

#33

8 12 feb 14

12 February 2014 Hearing Winter

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/433655563193286656/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VaXGGPVNnxU

 

#32

9 17 feb 14

17 February 2014 The Way We Were

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/435621354222526464/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6VhNaXV8K4U

 

#31

10 17 feb 14

17 February 2014 Peace of Mind

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/435639476686045184/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q5ZL8qvEmR0

 

#30

11 21 feb 14

21 February 2014 Doctor Pat

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/437033465536462849/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vuUpSnPXz0

 

#29

12 22 feb 14

22 February 2014 Honesty

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/437388430465462273/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4gOIt-M02A

 

#28

13 2 mar 14

2 March 2014 My Bologna

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/440310294867234816/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rmPRHJd3uHI

 

#27

14 5 mar 14

5 March 2014 Oklahoma

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/441273659001286657/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbrnXl2gO_k

 

#26

15 14 mar 14

14 March 2014 Hair

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/444682878396293120?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Qf2R-1saDQ

 

#25

16 29 mar 14

29 March 2014 Stupid

 

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/449943660134555649?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ers0YPoMxbk

 

#24

17 4 apr 14

4 April 2014 Words

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/452173873299980291?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sr-WW5abcwQ

 

#23

18 7 apr 14

7 April 2014 Oops

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/453267038077984768?refsrc=email

http://vimeo.com/54035300

 

#22

19 9 apr 14

9 April 2014 Call On Me

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/453922140312440833?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wh86uSsux1M&feature=kp

 

#21

20 17 apr 14

17 April 2014 Lights Went Out

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/456764575258402816?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uSSJwKixbKU

 

#20

21 19 apr 14

19 April 2014 Little Wonders

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/457546932161110016?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWU8_uUJJu0

 

#19

22 28 apr 14

28 April 2014 Undun

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/460961322163642368?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QzSLxYLuJhI

 

#18

23 15 may 14

15 May 2014 I’m Sorry 

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/467135943741157378?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4a_vhiBxi90

 

#17

24 5 june 14

5 June 2014 Let It Go

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/474655637620535296?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EtAG3e3JLNI

 

#16

royals

5 June 2014 We Will Never Be Doctors

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mxyNzqQNa50

 

#15

25 7 june 14

7 June 2014 Daniel Boone 

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/475246656968200192?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VLMCO-JZqWs

 

#14

26 10 jun 14

10 June 2014 Turn It Off

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/476212528289038336?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JjCfE1n6nW4&list=PLf470HqOWw3d8Oj5uAXPV19yJ7E7aGDwX&index=163

 

#13

27 13 jun 14

27 June 2014 Don’t Stop Me Now

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/477316980274237440?refsrc=email

http://vimeo.com/30126989

 

#12

28 14 jun 14

 14 June 2014 It’s a Grand Old Flag

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/477902903290515457/photo/1

http://fan.tcm.com/_James-Cagney-You39re-a-Grand-Old-Flag/video/1146300/66470.html?createPassive=true

 

#11

29 15 jun 14

15 June 2014 In the Living Years 

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/478362296126013440?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWiwde4z9Qk

 

#10

30 16 jun 14

16 June 2014 Pressure

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/478599157926473728?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJCTgtDU-74

 

#9

31 21 jun 14

21 June 2014 Sunrise

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/480542585535352832?refsrc=email

http://vimeo.com/88197078

 

#8

32 27 jun 14

27 June 2014 Listen

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/482653910616666112?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5aRRq9mquo

 

#7

33 29 jun 14

29 June 2014 Rumor Has It 

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/483451855125479424/photo/1

http://vimeo.com/41795630

 

#6

34 the letter

1 July 2014 The Letter

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/484055472618500096

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vrv9slgO7Ic

 

#5

35 all together now

2 July 2014 All Together Now

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/484446529210445824

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xFpW8g83g6E

 

#4

36 dialogue

4 July 2014 Dialogue

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/484941146976567296

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YTL53bmYqzM

 

#3

37 danger zone

4 July 2014 Danger Zone

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/484955780253106177

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=58QOBqAWNzE

 

#2

38 if you want it

6 July 2014 If You Want It Here It Is 

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/485956691708477442

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KWbTZuEWjnc

 

And the #1 musical tweet in the land is…

39 stipe tweet

7 July 2014 Everybody Hurts 

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/486224816618213376

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijZRCIrTgQc

 

*

keep you feet on the ground

 

*

*

 

STRENGTH IN NUMBERS

office M

Show up at my office on a typical Friday afternoon and the waiting room generally will be well populated. People in groups of threes, twos, and solitary ones are scattered about, flipping through magazines, glancing at wristwatches, a few even catnapping, waiting to hear their names called.

However, on this Friday everyone was assembled in one end of the room, all facing the same direction, all listening to the same thing, all sharing in the same experience.

talking to

I still don’t have an official name for the happening, but I’ve nicknamed it a “SIN” session, i.e. Strength In Numbers.  However, there’s nothing sinful about it.

Strength in Numbers is geared toward patients, is part classroom, part group therapy, and entirely beneficial to all participants – including me.

I had no trouble selecting the didactic elements. My practice is located on the border between Kentucky and Indiana – two states that have recently enacted laws and regulations for treating pain with controlled substances.

bridge

Both states’ regulations are instructive regarding educational requirements.

Kentucky’s regulations mandate:

A physician prescribing or dispensing a controlled substance shall take appropriate steps to educate a patient receiving a controlled substance.

There’s even a list of educational points to consider on the Kentucky Medical Board’s website.

Not to be outdone, Indiana’s regulations state:

The physician shall discuss with the patient the potential risks and benefits of opioid treatment for chronic pain, as well as expectations related to prescription requests and proper medication use.

Hoosier State regulations go on to list specific educational points that prescribers must cover with patients that include obtaining a patient’s informed consent.

agree

Obviously, to obtain informed consent a patient must be informed.

Indeed, most states’ regulations require that physicians educate their patients. The Federation of State Medical Boards agrees:

The physician’s duty includes not only appropriate prescribing of opioid analgesics, but also appropriate education of patients… inadequate attention to patient education (is a clear) departure from accepted best clinical practices.       

But, aside from the learning part, there is another, less precise, less quantifiable, factor in the equation that produces strength at these Friday afternoon get-togethers.

The numbers.

A group dynamic is quite therapeutic. For some time, psychology researchers have been able to show that group therapy is a “powerful intervention.”

Groups foster a community spirit; a sense that “I’m not in this alone.”

The group offers a sounding board. Members can help each other come up with specific ideas for improving a difficult situation or life challenge and even offer some accountability along the way.

The key therapeutic principles involved in group therapy include:

*Hope: Being with people who are coping or recovering gives hope to others who may be running short on this.

*Universality:  People see that they are not alone.

*Information: They help each other by learning and sharing a consistent message.

*Altruism: Self-esteem and confidence is boosted by sharing and helping others.

*A sense of family: The therapy group is much like a family in some ways. And because the group shares common goals, members gain a sense of belonging and acceptance.

Now, more and more, group sessions are utilized in the treatment of conditions other than purely psychological. The American Academy of Family Physicians has stated their belief that “group visits are a proven, effective method for enhancing a patient’s self-care of chronic conditions, increasing patient satisfaction, and improving outcomes.”

So, on this Friday afternoon we had a group “SIN” session. It started with a little levity and a brief informative video.

dr pat

Next, some definitions were explained, risks and alternatives were discussed along with “SMART” goals and proper stewardship of the medications. Patient responsibilities were explained. The educational points required by the Bluegrass and Hoosier States were covered. Some Q & A was encouraged throughout. It was interactive.

This was not a purely didactic session. There was eye contact and emotional contact. After all, pain is defined as a sensory and emotional experience.

And in the end, the participants didn’t just feel like a number.

And they had more strength to do battle.

As did their doctor.

On this atypical Friday afternoon.

There truly is strength in numbers.

Fireworks-047-screen

Continuity of Care

TourtheTower

On June 1, 2014 at Louisville’s historic and newly renovated Water Tower, the Greater Louisville Medical Society held its annual Presidents’ Celebration.

crowd at watertower

As outgoing president I had the honor of introducing Dr. Bruce Scott – my esteemed colleague and childhood friend – as our new President. I also thanked some of the many great folks who worked so hard to make this the most satisfying year of my professional life.

pat and bruce screen

Before I handed over the President’s gavel to Bruce and assumed my new role as Chair of the GLMS Board of Governors, I had this to say…

pat podium

A year ago, as your newly elected President, the last words I said on that stage were:

The Greater Louisville Medical Society is our organization, our tribe, our road to a place where medicine is both science and art, where our community enjoys wellness, and the sacred bond between our patients and us is secure. And my goal this year is to see us united.

murphy speech at pres celeb

It’s one year later, and our profession is under attack as never before. Physician burnout is an epidemic. This is why, more than ever, we must be united.

Back in the day, physicians were a more homogenous group. There were fewer specialists. We shared common values and common goals.

Now government, employers, specialties, patients, and family pull us in many directions. There is an ever-increasing burden for maintenance of board certifications and licensure. Each separate payer and practice facility requires its own credentialing. Medical liability risks keep mounting. The insatiable quest for quantifying quality with data points and benchmarks threatens to crush our creativity and mandate cookbook-style care. Rival non-physician tribes continuously grab pieces of what used to be our acknowledged scope of practice.

How do we respond? All too often by retreating to presumed “safe houses” provided by the one, two, three or more specialty societies each of us believes offers the most protection of our turf.

Got to survive, you know.

The irony is that these refuges are not safe at all. They are static. Stationary. It makes us benign targets for attack by all who would prefer a leaderless mechanized conveyor belt of universal one-size-fits-none healthcare. This sanctimonious deconstruction of our profession is done in homage and servitude to the inscrutable holy trinity of cost-effectiveness, quality, and value.

Survive?

Why not thrive!

Regardless of where your professional journey has led, you and I and our colleagues remain connected at our roots. We still share common values and must share common goals. We are physicians by education, oath, and calling.

And more…

We love our profession.

We love humanity.

And we love each other.

That is why we get up every day, put on our white coats, and go out to save the world.

Because it must be saved.

And we know…

We are the ones who must do it.

United.

gavel trophy