Pathway to Partnership, Part II (IN)

THE CHRONIC PAIN PATIENT’S GUIDE TO INDIANA’S REGULATIONS  Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 2.19.10 AM

No man is an island, Entire of itself, Every man is a piece of the continent, A part of the main. – John Donne

The poet, John Donne, knew it. Every Hoosier pain patient and Hoosier pain care provider should take it to heart. No patient or provider is an island. And pain care is best when there is a partnership between the patient and provider. The Pathway to Partnership If you are treated for pain in the Hoosier State the pathway to partnership with your physician passes through Indiana’s pain regulations. Indiana’s entire southern border is Kentucky. And when it comes to patient responsibilities, Kentucky’s pain regulations have much in common with Indiana’s. Therefore, Hoosier patients can begin preparation for their Indiana chronic pain care evaluation by reading my article: Pathway to Partnership, Part I (KY) – The Chronic Pain Patient’s Guide to Kentucky’s Regulations. Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 2.25.49 AM Available at: https://jamespmurphymd.com/2015/02/13/pathway-to-partnership Particular to Indiana is the Hoosier state’s emphasis on medication dosing limits that trigger mandatory compliance with the regulations. Calculating these dosing limits can be quite confusing and, frankly, patients are not responsible for knowing them. Prescribers are. But to be a good “partner” with your prescriber, you should at least become familiar with these dosing limits. Later in this article I will summarize. But first, in order to hold up your end of the partnership, here are ten items you can prepare:

  1. Your past medical history
  2. Your pertinent medical records
  3. An accurate medication list
  4. Any substance abuse history
  5. Your social and family history
  6. Any other medical issues
  7. Educate yourself for proper informed consent
  8. Your current level of function
  9. Your treatment goals
  10. Complete questionnaires & mental health screens

These ten items are discussed in detail in Pathway to Partnership, Part I (KY) – The Chronic Pain Patient’s Guide to Kentucky’s Regulations. Prepare as described above you will be well on your way to becoming a great partner in your care. As your partnership continues, expect to have contact with your physician on a regular basis and even randomly to:

      1. Review your progress with your treatment plan;
      2. Review the goals of your plan; and
      3. Review expectations (i.e. attending therapy, counseling, tests, etc.)

Insider Information As a partner, you are entitled to some “insider” information. Here it is… A new section of Indiana’s regulations contain a lengthy explanation of what prescribers must consider when ordering drug screens. By doing so, this section offers insight into appropriate patient behavior. The following list, summarized from the regulations, offers an insider’s look at what Indiana expects of a pain patient: In determining whether a drug monitoring test…is medically necessary, the physician shall consider” if the patient has:

      • Taken the meds as prescribed?
      • Taken more meds than allowed?
      • Given or sold meds to anyone?
      • Benefitted from the meds?
      • Taken any other drugs – legal or illegal?
      • Been honest and up front about past drug use?
      • Tried to get early refills?
      • Lost meds? Had them stolen?
      • Had an abnormal INSPECT state prescription report?
      • Failed a drug screen?
      • Been intoxicated?
      • Been acting aggressive, depressed, anxious, etc.?
      • Been diagnosed with a psychiatric condition?
      • Demanded certain specific meds?
      • Had a major illness? Pregnancy? Hospitalization?
      • Been resistant to any changes in the care plan?
      • Refused or failed to follow through with exams/tests?
      • Just not done well overall?

Bottom line: Be honest, up front and “transparent.” No one likes surprises. A good partnership is all about trust and communication. Understand what your treatment agreement says and live up to it. cs agree pic Dosing Limits Now, about those dosing limits… As I said, it can be confusing, but you should try to understand the concepts and discuss them with your prescriber. Not all pain prescriptions are subject to the Indiana regulations. Therefore, it is important to understand the dosing limits that trigger mandatory compliance. These limits are dependent upon: (1) the dose, (2) the quantity and (3) the duration. The Morphine Equivalent Dose (“MED”) is basically how strong your medication would be if it were to be substituted for morphine. This is very important to INDIANA regulatory agencies. I highly recommend you learn how to calculate your MED. Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 10.47.08 AM Calculating the MED Step ONE: Calculate the MED for one pill Determine the dose of morphine that would be equal to one of your pills using a standard conversion table (For example: a FIVE mgm hydrocodone pill is the same as a FIVE mgm morphine pill; but a FIVE mgm oxycodone pill would be the same as a 7.5 mgm morphine pill). Indiana officials recommend this website for help with making this determination: The online opioid calculator from GlobalRPH http://www.globalrph.com/narcoticonv.htm Screen Shot 2015-03-29 at 2.30.15 AM Step TWO: Calculate your DAILY MED Once you have converted your pill to its “morphine equivalent,” simply add up the maximum number of pills your prescription allows you to take in a day and multiply this number by the morphine equivalent (MED) you determined in step one. (Number of pills per day) x MED/one pill = Daily MED For example: Since a FIVE mgm hydrocodone pill is equal to a FIVE mgm morphine pill, the daily MED of someone taking THREE of these hydrocodone pills per day would be: 5 mgm x 3 pills per day = 15 mgm MED Here are some common ORALLY prescribed opioids that compare to a MED of 15: Hydrocodone (oral) 15 mgm/day = 15 mgm of morphine (oral) Oxycodone(oral) 10 mgm/day = 15 mgm of morphine (oral) Oxymorphone (oral) 5 mgm/day = 15 mgm of morphine (oral) Codeine (oral) mgm/day = 15 mgm of morphine (oral) Hydromorphone (oral) 3.75 mgm/day = 15 mgm of morphine (oral) Tramadol (oral) 150 = 15 mgm of morphine (oral) Note: MED greater than SIXTY If you are on a treatment regimen with a morphine equivalent dose of more than SIXTY (60) MED, the physician may require you to have an evaluation by a specialist. According to the regulations, your physician must explain to you that there is an increased risk of adverse outcomes, including death, when your daily MED is greater than SIXTY. So now that you understand the MED, you are ready to look at the DOSING LIMITS that trigger compliance with the regulations. DOSE, QUANTITY & DURATION When any of the following conditions are met, your physician (and you) must comply with the Indiana pain regulations.

      1. DOSE & DURATION >15 MED for >3 months

DAILY MED greater than FIFTEEN for DURATION of more than three consecutive months Or…

      1. QUANTITY & DURATION >60 pills for >3 months

More than SIXTY opioid pills per month for DURATION of more than THREE consecutive months Or…

      1. PATCHES > 3 months

Any opioid skin patches (e.g., fentanyl or buprenorphine), regardless of the dose or quantity, for DURATION of more than THREE consecutive months Or…

      1. Hydrocodone-Only Extended Release

Any hydrocodone-only extended release medication that is NOT in an “abuse deterrent” form, regardless of the DOSE, QUANTITY or DURATION Or…

      1. TRAMADOL (My advice) >150 mgm for >3 months

Actual language in the regulations state: “If the patient’s tramadol dose reaches a morphine equivalent dose of more than sixty (60) milligrams per day for more than three (3) consecutive months.” This tramadol dose limit seems to be overly generous when compared to other MED dosing limits. A SIXTY (60) MGM MED of tramadol is in the range of 300 to 600 mgm of tramadol. Considering that the maximum therapeutic dose for tramadol is only 400 mgm per day, one could potentially exceed the safe upper limit of tramadol and still not exceed Indiana’s dosing limit. This seems to be inconsistent with the regulation’s other opioid dosing limits. My advice: Since 150 mgm of tramadol is equivalent to a FIFTEEN (15) MED, I believe it is more consistent with the other Indiana opioid dosage limits to consider TRAMADOL greater than 150 mgm/day for more than THREE consecutive months as the dosage limit congruent with other opioid dosage limits. Reference: The online opioid calculator from GlobalRPH http://www.globalrph.com/narcoticonv.htm Wait!!! There are EXEMPTIONS !!! Regardless of the dose, quantity or duration, the Indiana pain regulations do not apply to these patients: (1) With a terminal condition (2) Residing in a licensed health facility (3) Enrolled in a licensed hospice program (4) Enrolled in a licensed palliative care program microphone 5 In summary, patients and physicians should travel the pathway to partnership together. Patients can do their part by (1) preparing for the clinical visits, (2) understanding and adhering to their treatment agreements, and (3) educating themselves about risks, side-effects, and legal aspects of their care. It is a real challenge to treat chronic pain in this day and age. Your physician needs your help. Will you leave it all up to your physician? Or will you be a good partner, heeding the words of the poet DonneAnd therefore never send to know For whom the bell tolls; It tolls for thee.  * podium thumbs up James Patrick Murphy, MD, MMM is Chair of the Board of Governors -and Immediate Past President- of the Greater Louisville Medical Society, Medical Director of Murphy Pain Center, and an Assistant Clinical Professor at the University of Louisville School of Medicine. Dr. Murphy contributes to numerous publications, has presented before national and international audiences, and consults with a wide spectrum of agencies and individuals regarding pain, addiction, and the future of healthcare in our country. He is board-certified in Pain Medicine, Anesthesiology, and Addiction Medicine. * References and links pertaining to this article are provided in the comments. * This unofficial summary is my personal opinion. A full, official version of the final rule should be consulted for compliance purposes at: http://www.in.gov/legislative/iac/20141105-IR-844140289FRA.xml.html The Indian State Medical Association also has a summary available at: http://www.ismanet.org/pdf/legal/IndianaPainManagementPrescribingFinalRuleSummary.pdf no harm And if you really want to explore the Indiana pain regulations in detail, there is no better source than the online guide: First Do No Harm, The Indiana Healthcare Providers Guide to the Safe, Effective Management of Chronic Non-Terminal Pain. http://www.in.gov/bitterpill/docs/First_Do_No_Harm_V_1_0.pdf * Hey Hoosier! Who’s your partner? handshake_between_doctor_and_patient_with_the_sky_background_1341168865 * * *

Pathway to Partnership, Part I (KY)

THE CHRONIC PAIN PATIENT’S GUIDE
TO KENTUCKY’S REGULATIONS
pathway rainbow

Even though I’m on the lowest dose possible to keep my chronic pain under control I still worry this too will be taken away. At each appointment I get scared I will be told my doctor can no longer prescribe what little medication I do get. I appreciate the pain relief I do get, it means more to me than people can imagine.
~Samuel
October 1, 2014 at 7:47 PM

People with pain must recognize that they have a role to play in making sure these medications remain available, as needed, to all.
~Steven D. Passik, PhD

Abstract: This is a summary of how chronic pain patients can effectively prepare for a productive and meaningful visit with their Kentucky physician to address pain care options -especially when care involves the use or potential use of controlled substances. The goal is that patients and physicians will work together to maximize the therapeutic benefits and minimize the inherent risks to patients, physicians, and society.

karen neck

Pain is the most common reason patients see physicians. We all feel pain, but everyone experiences pain in a unique way. There are many ways to treat pain, but treatment is best when tailored to the needs of the individual. Sometimes adequate pain treatment requires drugs (i.e. “controlled substances”) that expose users to risks of addictions, abuse and misuse. In these cases, patients and physicians must work together to minimize these risks.

It has been estimated that in the U.S. there is only one pain specialist for every 26,000 patients with chronic pain. Thus the majority of chronic pain treatment remains in the hands of primary care physicians.

Treating chronic pain can be straightforward when the primary focus is providing relief. But inescapable concerns about potential drug abuse and regulatory scrutiny can make treating chronic pain very complex and stressful for patients and physicians.

Most states have specific prescribing regulations that sometimes are inadequately communicated and poorly understood. This contributes to physician anxiety and adds to the physicians’ clinical, legal, and administrative burdens.

The patient-physician relationship must be a true partnership based on respect, trust, honesty, and clear communication. The following is a summary of what patients can do to help their physician partners.

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The Chronic Pain Patient’s Guide to Kentucky’s Regulations

write rx

General Recommendations:

  1. Prepare answers to some basic medical history questions.
  2. Obtain copies of pertinent documents and medical records.
  3. Make a list of your healthcare providers along with their contact information.
  4. You may wish to store the data on a flash drive, CD/DVD or upload to a secure website for retrieval by your physician. Be advised, until you give these documents to your physician you are responsible for keeping them private.
  5. Bring a friend or family member with you for support, assistance with questions, and to help verify information.

For the initial visit prepare the following:

  1. Medical history
  2. Medical records
  3. Medications
  4. Substance use
  5. Social and family history
  6. Other medical issues
  7. Education and consent
  8. Ability to function
  9. Goals
  10. Questionnaires / mental health screen
    1. Medical history. 

It begins with your “Chief Complaint.” This is where you tell your physician what hurts.

Chief complaint: My pain is _______________________
For example: “My pain is in my low back.”

Next, fill in some DETAILS about your pain:
(i) Cause. Based on what you know about your condition, what do you think is causing your pain?
Examples: a bad disk / pinched nerve / arthritis, etc. Be as specific as you can.
(ii) Location. Where does it start? Where does it go?
(iii) Quality. Sharp? Aching? Electrical? Sensitive to touch?
(iv) Symptoms. Numbness? Tingling? Weakness? Muscle wasting? Skin color changes? Swelling?
(v) Timing. Started when? Is it constant? Variable? Worse at certain times of the day? Lasts how long?
(vi) Aggravating factors. What makes it worse? Bending? Standing? Twisting? Being anxious? Working?
Housework? Sleep?
(vii) Relieving factors. What makes it better? Resting? Heat? Ice? Massage? Medication? Injections? Being
distracted? Sleep?
(viii) Pain scale. Rate your pain on a scale from: ZERO (no pain) to TEN (worst pain imaginable).

  1. Medical records.

Your physician may not need every record, but information about care related to your pain is useful and includes:

  • Surgery reports related to your pain (back surgeries, etc.);
  • Laboratory tests (blood tests, urine drug screens, etc.);
  • Studies (x-rays, MRI, CT, EMG, etc.);
  • Pain care treatments (epidurals, physical therapy, acupuncture, chiropractic, etc.);
  • Consultations with specialists (surgeons, pain, chiropractic, mental health).

Make a list of your diagnostic tests, especially the most recent ones; include dates and contact information. Gather the reports. If you wait for your physician to get the reports faxed, your pain care could be delayed significantly. You may want to copy them onto a flash drive, CD/DVD, or to a secure website.

  1. Medications.

(a) An accurate and current medication list is extremely important. Include the date, dosage, quantity, and directions. Bring the medicine bottles with you and/or labels, written prescriptions, etc.

Provide answers to these questions:

  • Do you find your current medications to be effective?
  • Are you taking them the way they have been prescribed for you?
  • How long have you been on your current medications?
  • When was the last time you had a medication change?
  • Are they causing you any unacceptable side effects such as: sedation, fatigue, nausea, constipation, etc.?

(b) Your medication “journey.” It is extremely important for your physician to know (and document) how you got to this point. What medications did you use in the past? Did you try some over-the-counter medications? Non-controlled substance prescriptions? Gather records (medical, pharmacy, etc.) to show how your dosages have changed over time.

(c) If you have a prescribing “agreement” with another physician, bring a copy.

  1. Substance use.

It is vital to be forthcoming about any substance abuse or any substance abuse treatment involving you or any close relative (especially a mother, father, son or daughter). And report any drug-related arrests?

Do you drink alcohol? Do you smoke?

Remember to drink plenty of fluids before your visit in case you are asked to provide a specimen for a random urine drug screen.

  1. Social and family history.

Where do you live and with whom?
Is your home life a challenge?
What is your occupation? Are you disabled?
Where do you get money to live on?
How much formal education have you had?

  1. Other medical issues.

Are you dealing with any other medical issues such as: diabetes, heart disease, cancer, etc.? When was your last general medical evaluation?

Note: To receive long-term controlled substances for pain in Kentucky, it is mandatory that you have a yearly preventive health evaluation.

  1. Education and consent.

Show that you have educated yourself about controlled substances and prepare to document your “informed consent.”

(a) The Kentucky Board of Medical Licensure has posted educational points of emphasis on their website.

I have prepared an educational summary for both Kentucky and Indiana which is available here: http://goo.gl/IJ4I1l

Or download the Murphy Pain Center New Patient Package. Study the patient education sheet. Print it out. Sign it. And bring it with you.

Watch this outstanding video by Dr. Mike Evans that explains many of the pros and cons of the use of controlled substances for chronic pain care.

(b) Once you have been informed, you are ready to give your “informed consent.” You may download this document and bring it to your physician:

I have written an article about informed consent and treatment agreements, Are We In Agreement, available on my website: Confluential Truth.

  1. Ability to function.

Describe your current ability to participate in life’s activities. This will give your physician a baseline from which to judge your progress. You may visit the website for ICSI (Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement) and download and complete the form in Appendix C: Physical Functional Ability Questionnaire (FAQ-5).

  1. Goals.

Come up with some specific and realistic goals that might be attainable. Think of how you can show when you have achieved them. Within reason, think about what you would like to do that you cannot do now. Be prepared to demonstrate this to the physician; i.e. walk without a cane, bend to pick up something, rise from a chair unassisted.

Set goals that are SMART: specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, and track-able.

  1. Questionnaires / Mental Health Screen

Complete these “screening” questionnaires and bring them to your visit.

You may go to the Kentucky Board of Medical Licensure website, download these self-report questionnaires, fill them out, and bring them to your office visit.

  • Opioid Risk Tool
  • Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), mental health screen

You may also go to the website for ICSI (Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement) and download and complete these two forms:

Appendix A (Brief Pain Inventory); and
Appendix B (Patient Health Questionnaire PHQ-9)

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If this all seems a bit overwhelming, you can begin to simplify matters by visiting the Murphy Pain Center website and downloading the “New Patient Package.” In it you will find policies, consent forms, agreements, educational materials, and a “New Patient Evaluation” form. These are the kinds of materials you will likely be filling out at your physician’s office visit. Having this information on hand can make your visit more productive.

In conclusion: Due to growing concerns about drug abuse, coupled with layer upon layer of regulations, physicians are becoming increasingly anxious about prescribing controlled substances for patients suffering in chronic pain.

Gen rec and initial

This has been a summary of how a chronic pain patient can effectively prepare for a productive and meaningful visit with his or her physician to address pain care options -especially when care involves the use or potential use of controlled substances. The goal is that both parties will work together to maximize the therapeutic benefits and minimize the inherent risks to patients, physicians, and society.

When patients are adequately prepared, physicians can feel more comfortable, and patients can more likely receive safe, effective, and proper pain care.

It is a partnership.

Screen Shot 2015-02-12 at 10.46.07 PM

Note: For the purposes of this summary “controlled substances” refers to CSA scheduled drugs 2 – 4 (Schedule 5 drugs are exempt from Kentucky’s regulations).

Note: Kentucky’s regulations do not apply if the patient is being treated:

(a) in hospice or “end-of-life” treatment;
(c) for cancer pain or pain associated with the treatment of cancer;
(b) in a licensed hospital as inpatient, outpatient, or observation status
(d) as a registered resident of a long-term-care facility
(e) during a disaster or mass casualty situation
(f) as a single dose for a diagnostic test or procedure

So now that you know the pathway…

Screen Shot 2015-02-12 at 10.40.38 PM

James Patrick Murphy, MD, MMM is Chair of the Board of Governors -and Immediate Past President- of the Greater Louisville Medical Society, Medical Director of Murphy Pain Center, and an Assistant Clinical Professor at the University of Louisville School of Medicine. Dr. Murphy contributes to numerous publications, has presented before national and international audiences, and consults with a wide spectrum of agencies and individuals regarding pain, addiction, and the future of healthcare in our country. He is board-certified in Pain Medicine, Anesthesiology, and Addiction Medicine.

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References and links pertaining to this article are provided in the comments.

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‘Twas the Fight in Our Clinic

orange jumpsuit

It was right before clinic and all through morn,
Not a patient was hurting, nor feeling forlorn.
The stocking of meds on the shelves was with care,
In hopes that ridiculous pain would be rare.
The front desk was nestled all snug in their seats,
Collecting the copays while smiling so sweet.
And I in my lab coat, scrub top, and a glove,
Had just settled in for the job that I love.

When out in the hall there arose such a clatter,
I sprang from my chair to see what was the matter.
Away to the window I flew like a flash,
Tore open the shutters and covered the cash.
A man on a quest, who did not like a “no,”
Gave bluster and chaos to our status quo.
When what to my watering eyes did appear?
But my signature forged on a pad that was near.
The villain prescriber had written so quick,
I knew in a moment it must be some trick.
I asked him his name and just why he had come,
But all he could say was he had to be on…

On Morphine, on Codeine, on Oxy, on Contin,
On Soma, on Xanax, and lots of Neurontin!
Don’t stop for the chart. Don’t stop in the hall.

Now right away! Right away! Write for it all !!!

As dry heaves that before a wild emesis fly,
When I met this intruder I thought I could die.
So onto the restroom I coerced him to…
Pee into a cup that might give me a clue.
But then, in his tinkling, I heard through his bleating,
The faucet, the flushing and knew he was cheating.
As I pulled back my hand and was turning around,
Through the window the specimen came with a bound.

I was stressed by his sight, and I thought for a while,
That his clothes were an orangey prisoner style.
A stencil of words were in print on his back,
When I asked him about it he called me a quack.

His lies, how repugnant; how simple his tally –
Prescription pain pills to sell in the back alley !!!

He had a clear package tied up with a bow,
And the powder inside was as white as the snow.
A piece of lead pipe he held tight in his hand,
And he swung it at me as he started to stand.
He had a gaunt face and not much of a belly,
And I shook when he laughed ‘cause his breath was so smelly.
He was stealing prescriptions, I thought to myself,
And I cringed when I saw him reach into the shelf.

A wink of his eye and a poke to my head,
Soon gave me to know I had something to dread.
He said he had come to us straight from his “work,”
And turned ’round to face me and called me a jerk.
He gave me the finger, then fingered my nose,
‘Til both of my nurses, they stomped on his toes.
He sprang to his car when we asked about jail,
And away he did run with the cops on his tail.
But he heard me exclaim, ‘ere he drove out of sight,

No prescriptions for you, because we do it right!

022812 police-chase

 

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While drug diversion is certainly no laughing matter, I couldn’t resist poking a little fun at some of the bumblers who have chosen this “career” path.

Here’s hoping that you have a joyous and pain-free holiday season!

Screen Shot 2014-12-17 at 7.54.11 PM

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Is it the singer or is it the song?

I love music.

I am not what one might call “musical.” I don’t have the pipes of a Whitney Houston (see: The Star Spangled Banner) or the soulfulness of a Bob Dylan (see: Blowing in the Wind), but I appreciate their unique virtuosity.

I am a pain care physician. Pain, like music, is a sensory and emotional experience. I don’t sing or play. I touch and treat.

Sometimes I may hit the perfect note, perform the perfect procedure, compose the perfect plan of care.

Other times, despite being well versed, my plan of care may not strike the right chord. Then creating a pleasant sensory and emotional experience depends upon the passion and conviction with which my care is conducted; my song is sung.

Is it the singer or is it the song?

Is it the caregiver or is it the care given?

Music is not only intertwined with my pain care. It is woven into every aspect of my life, including my Twitter feed.

Begging the question: Is it the tweeter or is it the tweet?

Let’s find out.

For a about a year I have been composing a Twitter message or two per day. Recently, I went back and was able to find forty tweets that were “musical” in some way. It may not be America’s top forty, but I think Casey Kasem would still have been pleased.

casey kasem b and w

There are songs from rock, country, and classical genres; from musicals, commercials, television, and the silver screen. Some are serious; some are silly. Original works, live performances, even parodies.

I now invite you to take a little journey through my musical tweets. Click on the image and the link should take you right to the performance. See if you can guess the song before you link to it. Ponder how it relates to the message. Enjoy the sensory and emotional experience. And decide for yourself…

Is it the tweeter or is it the twuuth* ?

 

* twuuth (definition)

  • noun\ˈtwüth\ the twuuth : the truth in a tweet

 

#40

1 25 oct 13

25 October 2013  How the Ghost Stole Pain Care. Dramatic reading by Phil Ward and music composed by Megan McIver

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/393876826809843712/photo/1

http://vimeo.com/77715467

 

#39

2 21 dec 13

21 December 2013  A Winter’s Solstice

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/414443104792354816?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kh_sckAUkgE&list=PLe1seBFJFklgHIqjjUUUhxZmL_rchZau9

 

#38

3 10 jan 2014

10 January 2014  Act Naturally

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/421697528891854848/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c-07qmTUi9A

 

#37

4 12 jan 2014

12 January 2014 Les Miserables

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/422410734950043648/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HPIos2mXbUE

 

#36

5 26 jan 14

26 January 2014 I’m Only Sleeping

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/427318581399789569/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KAsr-hix9s

 

#35

6 10 feb 14

10 February 2014 The Gold and Beyond

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/433042987648417792?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2hBB4DPw-h4

 

#34

7 12 feb 14

12 February 2014 ABC

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/433632926316515329/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I8GvDLDYhNM

 

#33

8 12 feb 14

12 February 2014 Hearing Winter

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/433655563193286656/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VaXGGPVNnxU

 

#32

9 17 feb 14

17 February 2014 The Way We Were

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/435621354222526464/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6VhNaXV8K4U

 

#31

10 17 feb 14

17 February 2014 Peace of Mind

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/435639476686045184/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q5ZL8qvEmR0

 

#30

11 21 feb 14

21 February 2014 Doctor Pat

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/437033465536462849/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vuUpSnPXz0

 

#29

12 22 feb 14

22 February 2014 Honesty

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/437388430465462273/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4gOIt-M02A

 

#28

13 2 mar 14

2 March 2014 My Bologna

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/440310294867234816/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rmPRHJd3uHI

 

#27

14 5 mar 14

5 March 2014 Oklahoma

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/441273659001286657/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbrnXl2gO_k

 

#26

15 14 mar 14

14 March 2014 Hair

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/444682878396293120?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Qf2R-1saDQ

 

#25

16 29 mar 14

29 March 2014 Stupid

 

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/449943660134555649?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ers0YPoMxbk

 

#24

17 4 apr 14

4 April 2014 Words

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/452173873299980291?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sr-WW5abcwQ

 

#23

18 7 apr 14

7 April 2014 Oops

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/453267038077984768?refsrc=email

http://vimeo.com/54035300

 

#22

19 9 apr 14

9 April 2014 Call On Me

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/453922140312440833?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wh86uSsux1M&feature=kp

 

#21

20 17 apr 14

17 April 2014 Lights Went Out

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/456764575258402816?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uSSJwKixbKU

 

#20

21 19 apr 14

19 April 2014 Little Wonders

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/457546932161110016?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWU8_uUJJu0

 

#19

22 28 apr 14

28 April 2014 Undun

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/460961322163642368?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QzSLxYLuJhI

 

#18

23 15 may 14

15 May 2014 I’m Sorry 

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/467135943741157378?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4a_vhiBxi90

 

#17

24 5 june 14

5 June 2014 Let It Go

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/474655637620535296?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EtAG3e3JLNI

 

#16

royals

5 June 2014 We Will Never Be Doctors

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mxyNzqQNa50

 

#15

25 7 june 14

7 June 2014 Daniel Boone 

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/475246656968200192?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VLMCO-JZqWs

 

#14

26 10 jun 14

10 June 2014 Turn It Off

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/476212528289038336?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JjCfE1n6nW4&list=PLf470HqOWw3d8Oj5uAXPV19yJ7E7aGDwX&index=163

 

#13

27 13 jun 14

27 June 2014 Don’t Stop Me Now

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/477316980274237440?refsrc=email

http://vimeo.com/30126989

 

#12

28 14 jun 14

 14 June 2014 It’s a Grand Old Flag

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/477902903290515457/photo/1

http://fan.tcm.com/_James-Cagney-You39re-a-Grand-Old-Flag/video/1146300/66470.html?createPassive=true

 

#11

29 15 jun 14

15 June 2014 In the Living Years 

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/478362296126013440?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWiwde4z9Qk

 

#10

30 16 jun 14

16 June 2014 Pressure

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/478599157926473728?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJCTgtDU-74

 

#9

31 21 jun 14

21 June 2014 Sunrise

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/480542585535352832?refsrc=email

http://vimeo.com/88197078

 

#8

32 27 jun 14

27 June 2014 Listen

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/482653910616666112?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5aRRq9mquo

 

#7

33 29 jun 14

29 June 2014 Rumor Has It 

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/483451855125479424/photo/1

http://vimeo.com/41795630

 

#6

34 the letter

1 July 2014 The Letter

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/484055472618500096

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vrv9slgO7Ic

 

#5

35 all together now

2 July 2014 All Together Now

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/484446529210445824

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xFpW8g83g6E

 

#4

36 dialogue

4 July 2014 Dialogue

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/484941146976567296

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YTL53bmYqzM

 

#3

37 danger zone

4 July 2014 Danger Zone

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/484955780253106177

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=58QOBqAWNzE

 

#2

38 if you want it

6 July 2014 If You Want It Here It Is 

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/485956691708477442

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KWbTZuEWjnc

 

And the #1 musical tweet in the land is…

39 stipe tweet

7 July 2014 Everybody Hurts 

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/486224816618213376

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijZRCIrTgQc

 

*

keep you feet on the ground

 

*

*

 

The Dream of Pain Care… Enough to Cope. the Seventeenth R. Dietz Wolfe Memorial Lecture

wolfe trophy

On April 12, 2014 my Norton Healthcare colleagues bestowed upon me the 17th R. Dietz Wolfe Education Award. Hopefully my presentation of the Wolfe Lecture adequately honored the legacy of the esteemed and beloved Dr. Wolfe.

For now, I humbly offer this synopsis…

Note: This article was updated on April 1, 2015 to reflect the most recent changes to states’ regulations.

 

The Dream of Pain Care… Enough to Cope

   – the 17th R. Dietz Wolfe Memorial Lecture 

 

karen neck

the algiatrist

 

a private place

study her face

fix on his eyes

feel her sinew

give an embrace

 

innovation

radiation

numb a raw nerve

eradicate

pain creation

 

to interlope

to offer hope

through some relief

tiny solace

enough to cope

 

– James Patrick Murphy

 

caring hands copy 2

Contrary to what one might think, it is generally not difficult to satisfy the needs of patients with chronic pain. Like the poem says, they simply need “enough to cope.” What’s difficult is the juggling act providers must perform to keep three “balls” in the air: patients must do well, regulations must be followed, and drug abuse must be prevented. Drop any of these three balls and you fall as well.

Sometimes the fall is hard. A couple of weeks ago I learned of a pain doctor in northern Kentucky who, on the heels of lawsuits and a medical board investigation, took his own life.

Then there was Dr. Dennis Sandlin, an eastern Kentucky country doctor who was shot and killed in his office by a patient upset because the doctor would not prescribe pain pills to him without first doing a drug screen.

Unfortunately, these scenarios are not our only threat. Federal prosecutors have even tried to use overdose deaths to trigger death penalty statues when seeking indictments against doctors.

And we hear sobering statistics like:

One person dies every 19 minutes from an overdose.

One “addicted” baby is born every hour.

Opioid pain drugs cause more overdose deaths than heroin and cocaine combined.

And now more people die from drug overdose than car accidents.

blame

For this crisis physicians take the brunt of the pundits’ blame, despite the fact that more than two-thirds of the diverted medications are acquired from family, friends, and acquaintances – not from a prescription by their doctor.

So why do it? Why treat chronic pain?

Perhaps because:

Over 100 million Americans suffer from pain, and that number is growing.

Pain affects more Americans than cancer, heart disease, and diabetes combined.

Up to 75% of us endure our dying days in pain.

True. But pain care, perhaps, means a little bit more?

Hypnosis-Pain-Control

To answer that question we must first understand what pain is: an unpleasant sensory and emotional experience associated with actual or potential tissue damage or described in terms of such damage.

Second, let’s understand the distinction between addiction and abuse. Addiction is a primary, chronic disease of brain reward, motivation, memory and related circuitry. Drug abuse describes behavior born of bad decision-making; not the disease of addiction. But indeed, bad choices, bad behavior, and drug misuse lead to crime, accidents, social instability, and addiction. The developing adolescent brain is particularly susceptible to addiction, while the elderly brain is practically immune.

nucleus

Third, let’s understand the risk factors for addiction: (a) environmental, (b) patient-related, and (c) drug-related. We cannot control our patient’s environment, occupation, peer group, family history, or psychiatric issues. But we can gather information and get a feel for his or her risk level. Then we can control what we prescribe – understanding the characteristics of an “addictive” drug include the drug’s availability, cost, how fast it gets to the brain (i.e. lipid solubility), and the strength of the “buzz” it produces.

And thus we can understand how important it is to prescribe the lowest dose possible for the minimum amount of time necessary, based on the level of risk in properly screened patients; then reassess. When in doubt, prescribe even less and reassess more often. Never feel obligated to prescribe more than what you are comfortable prescribing. Pain may be the number one reason a patient visits a doctor and pain care is indeed a patient’s right; however, controlled substances for pain care are a privilege. And just like it is with prescribers, the patients have responsibilities and obligations to meet, lest they endanger their privileges. They must become good stewards of the medications they are prescribed.

eVoice pic

Despite these serious risks to their community, their patients, and their medical licenses, physicians regularly rise to the occasion and treat pain. Over the past year as President of the Greater Louisville Medical Society, I have written a monthly article for our journal, Louisville Medicine. The reasons that physicians so often rise are woven throughout those essays. Here are few selected passages…

*

June: We have core values that we share, and when our strategy is in line with achieving the greater good our choice of profession becomes a higher calling.

*

July: We can positively affect people’s lives in a dramatic way and on a grand scale if we commit to our shared values, reconnect and work together. It is not only possible. It is our inherent duty.

*

August: Think back to when you were happiest as a physician. It was probably when you did something that was completely selfless, without any concern that the benefit outweighed the cost, without consideration of a return on investment. 

*

September: It is why we started down this tortuous path. It’s why we gave up our youth to endless lectures, textbooks, labs, insomnia, and stress, risked our health, and stole from our family life. We went into debt, endured ridicule on morning rounds, and exposed our careers to legal ruin – all so we could commit to helping the people important to our profession: our patients.

*

October: Her strength, courage and positive attitude have always inspired me. In the cacophony of that noisy mall time stood still as our eyes met. I told her who I was and how inspiring she is to me. She smiled and we hugged. That was a moment of confluential truth. Never take for granted this precious gift.

*

November: I can never be 100 percent sure why I do what I do… but I do know the best decision is always the honest decision, regardless.

*

December: I have been blessed with the opportunity to connect intimately with people on many levels. I’ve noticed those who preserve their joy despite insurmountable challenges… They have perspective. Humans are the only organisms aware of concepts like the past, the future, beauty, love, death, and eternity.

*

January: Every imperceptible moment that passes is not only a new reality; it is rebirth, renewal, and redefinition. How will I define myself?

*

February: The place where you started is your true self; the self that is your center; the self that creates your thoughts and actions. Regardless of your life’s circumstances, success is achieved when your thoughts and actions are in harmony with the true you.

*

March: Failure can be painful. It exposes vulnerability. Physicians, myself included, can be very hard on ourselves sometimes, thinking that by intense training and adherence to protocol, preparation, and planning we are somehow immune to failure. This is, of course, not true. Failure is painful – necessary pain – providing motivation to change, evolve, and realize your role in nature’s play of perfection. Failure is not a result as much as it is a feeling. Failure is… a conduit to greatness.

*

April: I will connect with you as a person – not a diagnosis. …No phone calls, no texting, no social media are allowed to come between you and me. Only then, with laser focus, do I proceed. The job demands this. You deserve this.

*

May: There is a shortage in our profession – a shortage of practical dreamers who can remain child, student, explorer, and physician. Your profession and your patients need you to be this physician. And you need you to be this person.

*

While becoming this physician requires the acquisition of vast knowledge, no one cares what you know until they know that you care. But even the most caring physicians find it hard to keep aim at the moving target of pain regulations. Still, if we are going to do this (i.e. treat pain) we should do it right; in a manner that keeps our community safe and our medical licenses secure.

EinsteinAtBlackboard-259x300

Throughout my years of medical training I have organized data by creating poems, algorithms, and acronyms. It’s been helpful for me. Maybe they will be helpful for you. Here are some such aids I find useful in the care of pain patients.

AAAA – items to address at pain reassessments

Analgesia level (e.g. a “zero to ten” scale)

Activity level (e.g. functional goals)

Adverse effects (e.g. side effects)

Aberrancy (e.g. worrisome behavior, diversion, addiction, depression)

*

PPPP – the differential diagnosis when they ask for more medication

Pathology (e.g. new or worsening disease)

Psychology (e.g. depression, anxiety, addiction)

Pharmacology (e.g. tolerance, altered metabolism, hypersensitivity, neuropathic pain)

Police-related (e.g. unlawful diversion)

*

Kentucky has adopted (and revised) a law and numerous regulations that address the prescription of controlled substances. Here’s some helpful advice pertinent to prescribers in Kentucky:

Plan to THINK – What to do initially when prescribing for the first 90 days

Plan – Document why the plan includes controlled substances.

Teach – Educate the patient about proper use and disposal.

History – Appropriate history and physical

Informed consent – Risks need to be explained and consent documented.

No long acting – Don’t prescribe sustained release opioids for acute pain.

KASPER – Query the state’s prescription monitoring program.

*

COMPLIANCE – That which needs to be done by the 90 day mark

C          Compliance monitoring (i.e. Query KASPER, check a urine drug screen)

O         Old records (obtain more records if necessary)

M         Mental health screening (i.e. depression, anxiety, personality disorders)

P          Plan (establish specific functional goals for periodic review)

L          Legitimate working diagnosis established (i.e. objective evidence)

I           Informed consent (written) & treatment agreement (recommended)

A         ADDICTION / Diversion Screening

N         Non-controlled medications tried before going to controlled substances.

C          Comprehensive history needs to be obtained and documented.

E          Exam “appropriate” to establish baselines for follow-up.

*

PQRST – That which needs to be ongoing after the ninety-day mark

P          Periodic review (after the first month, up to physician’s judgment)

Q         Query KASPER every three months

R         Refer to specialists and consultants as necessary

S          Screen annually for general health concerns

T         Toxicology screens (i.e. urine) and pill counts randomly and at intervals dependent on the patient’s level of risk.

For more detail please review: THE CHRONIC PAIN PATIENT’S GUIDE TO KENTUCKY’S REGULATIONS” -available at https://jamespmurphymd.com/2015/02/13/pathway-to-partnership

indiana

Let’s not forget Indiana. In December 2013 emergency regulations in the Hoosier state were enacted. These were updated and filed as permanent regulations on October 7, 2014. Indiana’s permanent pain regulations apply when any of the following conditions are met:

  1. DOSE & DURATION >15 MED for >3 months

DAILY MED (“morphine equivalent dose”) greater than FIFTEEN for DURATION of more than three consecutive months

Or…

  1. QUANTITY & DURATION >60 pills for >3 months

More than SIXTY opioid pills per month for DURATION of more than THREE consecutive months

Or…

  1. PATCHES > 3 months

Any opioid skin patches (e.g., fentanyl or buprenorphine), regardless of the dose or quantity, for DURATION of more than THREE consecutive months

Or…

  1. Hydrocodone-Only Extended Release

Any hydrocodone-only extended release medication that is NOT in an “abuse deterrent” form, regardless of the DOSE, QUANTITY or DURATION

Or…

  1. TRAMADOL (My advice) >150 mgm for >3 months

Actual language in the regulations state: “If the patient’s tramadol dose reaches a morphine equivalent dose of more than sixty (60) milligrams per day for more than three (3) consecutive months.”

This tramadol dose limit seems to be overly generous. My advice: Since 150 mgm of tramadol is equivalent to a FIFTEEN (15) MED, I believe it is more consistent with the other Indiana opioid dosage limits to consider TRAMADOL greater than 150 mgm/day for more than THREE consecutive months as the dosage limit congruent with other opioid dosage limits.

Reference: The online opioid calculator from GlobalRPH http://www.globalrph.com/narcoticonv.htm

For more detail please review: THE CHRONIC PAIN PATIENT’S GUIDE TO INDIANA’S REGULATONS” -available at https://jamespmurphymd.com/2015/03/29/pathway-to-partnership-part-ii-in

 

Indiana Physicians have DRIVE

When these thresholds are met, Indiana physicians must DRIVE

  • DRAMATIC at the start;
  • REVIEW the plan, REVISE the plan & REFER if the morphine equivalent dose is greater than 60 mg/day;
  • INSPECT at least annually;
  • VISIT face-to-face with the patient at least every 4 months; and
  • EXAMINE a drug screen if there is any indication.

Drug screening takes up a significant portion of Indiana’s regulations. The regulations actually list eighteen “factors” to consider. But the bottom line is that a drug screen (with lab confirmation) shall be ordered: “At any time the physician determines that it is medically necessary…(for any) factor the physician believes is relevant to making an informed professional judgment about the medical necessity of a prescription.”

 Indiana Physicians are DRAMATIC

At the initial evaluation a Hoosier physician must be DRAMATIC

         Diagnosis (establish a “working diagnosis” of the painful condition)

         Records obtained (a diligent effort made to obtain & review)

         Assessment of pain level

        Mental health (and substance abuse) screening

         Activity (functional) goals need to be established

         Tests should be ordered, if indicated

          Instead of opioids, use non-opioid options first

C          Conduct a focused history and physical

 

Both states emphasize the importance of treatment agreements, informed consent, and patient education. These subjects, along with helpful examples are presented in my article: “Are We In Agreement?” -available for review and download at: https://jamespmurphymd.com/2014/02/19/are-we-in-agreement

*

Regardless of one’s locale, treating pain with controlled substances can be dramatic. I’m reminded of a scene from the movie “The Music Man,” where Professor Harold Hill warned the people of River City:

prof

Either you’re closing your eyes to a situation you do not wish to acknowledge, or you are not aware of the caliber of disaster indicated by the presence of a pool hall in your community.

Well my friends, the same emotional message is often said of physicians who treat pain. This “mass-staria” can be lessened by utilizing REMS (Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies). REMS has been promulgated by the FDA with the goal of decreasing the risk associated with some risky drugs – especially the opioids.

The yin and yang of REMS is education and monitoring. The informed consent, patient agreement, and educational points together serve as a foundation for a medical practice’s effective REMS program.

Two prime examples of efforts to educate prescribers are (a) the OPIOID course sponsored by the Greater Louisville Medical Society and (b) the First Do No Harm Providers Guide from Indiana’s Prescription Drug Abuse Taskforce.

opioid logo

no harm

When both prescriber and patient understand the risks and watch for the telltale signs, early intervention can keep you out of trouble, despite what the Harold Hills of the world might say.

In my experience, most people will do the right thing if they know what the right thing is. President Ronald Reagan’s Cold War policy with the Soviet Union was to “trust but verify.” When you give someone a reputation to live up to, they are positively motivated to deserve that reputation – and deserve that trust. The various measures prescribers take to verify proper use of pain medications provide boundaries that can guide and comfort all parties involved. Beyond the rules, regulations, and guidelines that make up these boundaries, lies the indisputable truth that physicians have an obligation to treat suffering. It’s our calling.

Hess obit

I’m reminded of these words from our departed colleague, Dr. Patrick Hess:

 

All physicians are artists,

not always in disguise.

Our way of looking at a patient,

allowing our minds to roam,

all over those perceptions of our previous life,

often forgotten,

to scan these memories,

and pull something from our unconscious mind,

all with the purpose of creating something,

something to help the patient.

This creation is,

itself,

a work of art.

 

When I decided to include this poem in my lecture presentation, I really had no inkling that Patrick Hess was Dr. Wolfe’s “oldest friend.” Nor was I aware Dr. Wolfe’s first love was journalism, or that he was the “bright” nephew of his beloved uncle, famed novelist Thomas Wolfe. I only knew that there was a message of conviction, hope, and inspiration that needed to be heard. I would like to think that these three kindred spirits were in attendance and that they approved of my message. And I would like to think that you will not merely approve, but will take action so that the dream of pain care, enough to cope, devoid of drug abuse, can be realized.

kel in surf

 

*

This summary is my own opinion and is not legal advice. Each facility and physician should consult its own legal counsel for advice and guidance.

Ya Got Trouble !

11 drugs lik cocaine ladies

At the intersection of emotionally charged trains of thought, lies the potential for hyperbole, hysteria, and high drama. Nowhere is this more evident than in our nation’s debate over the utility of prescription pain drugs. Both sides offer sobering statistics. We cringe hearing that more people die from drug overdoses than from motor vehicle accidents. Then in the next breath we’re saddened by the news now one hundred million Americans suffer from chronic pain. This all may be true, yet still I’m reminded of what Mark Twain wrote, “There are three kinds of lies: lies, damned lies and statistics.” Unfortunately, efforts at finding truth can sometimes become sidetracked by blowhards with hidden agendas.

2 stay here  second one

Twain was a fan of satire, so in that spirit I would like to offer my concept of how The Music Man’s dashing huckster “Professor” Harold Hill might have taken on the pain debate. In the movie, this self-proclaimed music teacher/instrument salesman sounded the alarm over “the presence of a pool hall.” Here is what he might have said, had it been a pain clinic instead. Note, if you’ve never seen the musical, I recommend you watch the video clip first.

3 friend either you are

Friend, either you’re closing your eyes to a situation you do not wish to acknowledge, or you are not aware of the caliber of disaster indicated by the presence of a pain clinic in your community.

 Well… Ya got trouble, my friends, right here, 
I say, trouble right here in your city.

 Why sure I’m a pain physician, certainly mighty proud to say,  
I’m always mighty proud to say it.

I consider that the hours I spend, needle in my hand, are golden.
Helps you cultivate horse sense, and a cool head, and a keen eye.

 3 g a cool head
Did ya ever try to treat a herniated disk with an epidural steroid shot?

 
But just as I say it takes judgment, brains and maturity 
to place a needle in the spine,
I say that any boob can pull a pad from his pocket.

And I call that sloth, 
the first big step on the road to the depths of deg-ra-da–

I say first, medicinal mar-i-ju-ana, then pills from a bottle.

4 and the next thing you kow 
And the next thing ya know 
your pills are selling for money on a back street route.

And listed on some big out of town KASPER*
showing how they’ve been doctor shoppin’.

Not a wholesome caring place, no! 
But a place where they pay cash right on the spot!

 Like to see some screwed up druggie boy sittin’ in your office?
Make your blood boil? 
Well, I should say. Now friends, let me tell you what I mean.

You got nine – new – pain – regs – that – were passed by the board.**

Regulations that mark the difference between a specialist and a bum, 
with a capital “B” 
and that rhymes with “P” 
and that stands for PAIN!

And all day long that pain clinic bunch will be loitering around, 
I say those addicts will be loitering,
loitering around your up town, middle town, down town too!

 5 here him tell about
Get the pills in their pockets, 
never mind setting functional goals
or the records reviewed
or agreements signed.

 
Never mind taking too many 
so your patients are caught 
with the bottle empty
on a Saturday night,
and that’s trouble.

 
Yes you got lots and lots of trouble.
I’m thinkin’ of the pain pill partiers
old ones, young ones, 
caring not a bit about breaking all the rules.

6 and that stands for pool pointing with crowd 
Ya got trouble, folks! Right here in your city.
Trouble, with a capital “T”
and that rhymes with “P”
and that stands for PAIN!

 Now, I know all you docs have the right kinda patients. 

I’m gonna be perfectly frank.
Would ya like to know what kind of conversation goes on 
while they’re loafing around your halls?

 
They’ll be tryin’ out Oxy, tryin’ out morphine
tryin’ out fentanyl and Zohydro.

And braggin’ all about 
how they’re gonna cover up a bad drug screen with with Clorox.

 8 zyour son and your daughter
One fine night, they leave the clinic, 
headin’ for a chance at the pharmacy.
Desperate men, enabling women! 
Narcotic shameless craving
that’ll make your son and your daughter 
defy every decent societal instinct.

 
 ADDICTION !

 
Friends, the stoner brain is the devil’s playground! Trouble!

 
Oh we got trouble. Right here in your city!
with a capital “T” 
that rhymes with “P” 
and that stands for PAIN!

 
We’ve surely got trouble! Right here in your city.
Gotta figure out a way to treat and not just go insane.

 7 caring not a bit about breakin all the rules

Doctors of this city, heed that warning before it’s too late! 
Watch for the telltale signs of addiction!

 The minute after your patient walks into your office,
does he claim to be paralyzed below the knee?

 10 below the knee
Is there a needle track mark on his index finger? 

 
A dime bag hidden in his butt pack?

Is he starting to visit web sites
like “How to Pass a Whiz test” dot com?

 
Are certain drugs showing up on urine drug screens
Drugs… like cocaine? And… heroin?

 14 the devils tool
Well, if so my friends, ya got trouble, right here in your city!
with a capital “T”
and that rhymes with “C” 
and that ain’t cool.

 
We’ve surely got trouble! Right here in your city! 
Remember that pain clinic doc is a willing fool!

 
Oh, we’ve got trouble! 
We’re in terrible, terrible trouble!
Those pills for the fifteen hundred cash is the devil’s tool.

 
Oh yes we got trouble, trouble, trouble! 
Oh yes we got trouble here, we got big big trouble!

 
With a “T”
Gotta rhyme it with “P”
And that stands for PAIN!

13 is a willing fool

 

*KASPER is the Kentucky All-Schedule Prescription Electronic Reporting system

**The Kentucky Board of Medical Licensure

 

###

Spoiler alert… Professor Harold Hill had nothing against the pool hall. He wasn’t even a music professor. He was a con artist with a hidden agenda. He wanted to make a big score selling band instruments then bolt out of town. In the end though, Harold Hill had a change of heart and found true love.

If we can cool down the hyperbole, hysteria and high drama; if we can look beyond the soaring rhetoric and eye-popping statistics; if we can engage in honest and respectful communication; perhaps we can find meaningful solutions to our nation’s pain medication crisis.

15 last one with statue

Remember my friends,
listen to me,
because I pass this way but once!

ARE WE IN AGREEMENT?

…One Pain Specialist’s Take on the Controlled Substances Prescriber-Patient Agreement 

 me and c arm

With all of the information and misinformation about pain medicines, addiction, and prescription drug abuse, I thought it might be useful to publish a sample of what a “full-bodied” patient-prescriber agreement looks like. More and more states are requiring these for ongoing treatment with powerful medications that have a substantial potential for abuse (i.e. “controlled substances”). Although this version may not be best for everyone (some may be longer, some shorter), my pain management office uses a document similar to this.

So if you have a little time on your hands and want to know what goes into these agreements, here’s my take on what a thorough prescriber-patient agreement looks like.

 cs agree pic

 

INTRODUCTION:

I understand controlled substances medications (i.e. opioid pain medications, tranquilizers, etc.) have a potential for harm and are therefore closely controlled by the local, state and federal governments. I understand that any medical treatment is initially a trial, with the goal of treatment being to improve my quality of life and my ability to function and/or work. My progress will be assessed periodically to determine the benefits of continued treatment. Continued use is dependent on whether my prescribing provider and I believe that the medication usage benefits me. These drugs can be useful, but have high potential for misuse and are therefore closely regulated. This agreement will help my healthcare provider and me and comply with controlled substance regulations. I agree to use opioids (morphine-like drugs) as part of my treatment plan. The success of my treatment depends on trust, honesty and understanding of how opioids are used. I understand that violation of any part of this agreement may result in this medication being discontinued, as well as termination of my relationship with my provider. I agree to the following conditions:

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SECURITY OF THE MEDICATIONS:

I am responsible for keeping my pain medications in a safe and secure place, such as a locked cabinet or safe. I am expected to protect my medications. If my medication is stolen, I will report this to my local police department and obtain a stolen item report. I will also report the stolen medication to my physician. I agree that if my medications are lost, misplaced, stolen, or if I use them up sooner than prescribed, my physician may choose not to replace my medications.  I understand that this opioid medication is strictly for me. I will never give away my medications or sell them to others, because it may endanger that person’s health and is against the law.

FOLLOWING DIRECTIONS:

Unless directed to by my prescriber, I will not alter my medication in any way, and I will take my medication whole. My medication will not be broken, chewed, crushed, injected, or snorted. I am responsible for my opioid medications. I will not allow my medications to be damaged.  I will take my medication exactly as instructed and prescribed. I know that any change in dosage or directions must be approved by my licensed provider. I am responsible for taking the medication in the doses prescribed and for keeping track of the amount remaining. I will not take more than is prescribed.

TIME-LIMITED USE FOR ACUTE CONDITIONS:

I understand that a controlled substance used to treat an acute medical complaint is for time-limited use. I will discontinue the use of the controlled substance when the condition requiring the controlled substance use has resolved.

WHEN OTHER CONDITIONS OR SYMPTOMS ARISE:

I will notify my healthcare provider of side effects that continue or are severe or impair me in any way. I will notify Pain Center by the next business day if I need to visit another physician or need to visit an emergency room due to pain or if I become pregnant.

I agree to not request or accept a controlled substance medication from any other prescriber or individual while I am a patient at Pain Center. However, if another licensed provider, after being made aware of my Pain Center Agreement, still feels it is in my best interest to administer or prescribe a controlled substance for me, I will notify Pain Center by phone by the next business day. I will inform all of my healthcare providers of all medications I am taking, including herbal remedies. I understand that medications, including over-the-counter non-prescription medications can interact with opioid medications and be dangerous.

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NO ILLICIT SUBSTANCES:

I will not use any illicit substances such as cocaine, marijuana, etc. I understand that the use of alcohol together with opioid medications is dangerous and can lead to death. I will promptly inform my Pain Center prescriber if I use or intend to use any of these substances, including alcohol.

KEEPING APPOINTMENTS:

It is my responsibility to schedule appointments for the next refill. I will communicate fully and honestly with my prescriber about my pain level and my activities. I understand that in order to more thoroughly evaluate my plan of care as it pertains to the use of controlled substances, I may have additional visit scheduled at my provider’s discretion. I will keep all my Pain Center appointments.  If I must reschedule, I will notify Pain Center prior to my scheduled time.  If an appointment for a prescription refill is missed, I will request another appointment as soon as possible. I know that immediate or emergency appointments to address medication issues may not be available. However, I understand that I am allowed to seek the services of another healthcare provider in the event of an emergency or acute situation.

REFILLS:

Refills will not be made as an “emergency.” They will be made at planned clinic visits, during regular business hours. I will not expect any medications will be prescribed during the evening or on weekends. I do not expect prescriptions to be written in advance due to vacations, meetings or other commitments. I do not expect my prescriptions to be mailed. I expect that a government issued picture ID will be required to pick up prescriptions.

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ONE DESIGNATED PHARMACY:

I will designate and use only one pharmacy for all of my controlled substance medications and give the Pain Center full permission to communicate with the pharmacist about my medical care and medications.  Unless I have been given authorization by Pain Center, controlled substance prescriptions can only be filled by a pharmacy in the same state as the Pain Center, even if I am a resident of another state. I will allow my prescriber and his or her associates to send a copy of this agreement to my other healthcare providers and/or to the pharmacy where I obtain my prescriptions.

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DRUG TESTING: 

My prescriber may perform drug testing on me. I agree that I may be called at any time to come in to the clinic for a count of all my remaining medications and/or a drug screen and I agree to come that day. I agree to be responsible for any costs this may incur. If requested to provide a urine sample or other type of sample if necessary. If I decide not to provide a urine sample, I understand that my prescriber may change my treatment plan. This might include discontinuation of my opioid medications or complete termination of our patient-prescriber relationship. The presence of a non-prescribed drug or illicit drug in my urine may be cause for termination of our relationship.

SHARING INFORMATION:

I agree to allow my healthcare provider to contact any healthcare professional, family member, pharmacy, legal authority, or regulatory agency to obtain or provide information about my care or actions if the he or she feels it is necessary. I will allow my prescriber and his or her associates to receive information from any health care provider or pharmacist about use or possible misuse of alcohol and other drugs. I will allow my prescriber and and his or her associates to contact my family and friends to monitor my conditions.  Furthermore, I consent to a criminal background check.

PRIMARY CARE PROVIDER RELATIONSHIP:

I have and will maintain at all times a relationship with a primary care provider and keep him or her informed of all medications I am taking. I agree to and understand the requirement that I have an annual preventive health screening and physical exam by my primary care provider. If recommended, I will see a specialist and/or complete a screening exam to help determine whether I am developing an addiction or psychological illness.  I agree to be responsible for any costs this may incur.

FUNCTIONAL GOALS:

I understand that the main treatment goal is to improve my ability to function. I understand that in general, it is unrealistic for patients to expect complete resolution of their chronic pain with any specific treatment or combination of therapies. I understand that it is important to have a conversation with my provider about my treatment plan and set realistic goals for improvement. I pledge to work together with my provider towards improving my pain control and achieving specific functional goals. I understand that functional goals might include increasing physical activity level, resuming a job/hobby or improving the quality of sleep.

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AN “EXIT STRATEGY”:

I understand the concept of an “exit strategy” regarding these medications. I agree that if any of the following goals are not attained this may be evidence of a failure of opioid therapy and discontinuation of some or all of my medications could be the most appropriate plan: (1) meaningful pain control; or (2) acceptable level of function; or (3) tolerable side-effects; or (4) stable and acceptable mental health and behavior: or (5) compliance the plan of care, laws, and regulations.

PATIENT EDUCATION:

I acknowledge that I have been educated on the following matters through verbal or written counseling: (1) proper use; (2) impact on driving and work safety; (3) effect of use during pregnancy; (4) potential for overdose and appropriate response to overdose; (5) safe storage of controlled substances; and (6) proper disposal.

OFF-LABEL USE OF MEDICATION:

All prescription drugs in the US have a label approved by the FDA.  This label provides an indication and dosage for the drug, but neither physician nor patient is legally bound to follow them.  Studies cannot reliably evaluate all the combination treatments in complicated, difficult-to-treat conditions. I understand that my treatment may include “off label” use of medications. 

DISCONTINUATION OF CARE:

I understand that my violation of any of the above conditions may result in re-evaluation of my treatment plan and discontinuation of my medication. I could be gradually taken off these medications or even discharged from the clinic. If my violation involves obtaining controlled substances from another individual, as described above, I may also be reported to my physician, medical facilities and other authorities, including the police.

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I HEREBY AGREE:

I have read this agreement or it has been explained to me by the Pain Center practitioners and/or staff. If I am not currently receiving controlled substances from Pain Center, this agreement does not apply.  However, I understand that this agreement immediately becomes effective if in the future I do receive controlled substances.  I fully understand the consequences of violating this agreement.  I have been explained the risks and potential benefits of these therapies, including, but not limited to, psychological addiction, physical dependence, withdrawal and over dosage. All of my questions regarding the treatment of pain with opioids have been answered to my satisfaction. I hereby agree to participate in the opioid medication therapy and acknowledge that I have received this document.

Disclaimer: This is not legal advice.  This is not medical advice.  This is my personal opinion and has not been endorsed by any individual or entity.  All persons should consult his or her own legal counsel and/or health care providers for advice and guidance.

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First Do No Harm: The Indiana Healthcare Providers Guide to the Safe, Effective Management of Chronic Non-Terminal Pain, Version1.0  http://www.in.gov/bitterpill/docs/First_Do_No_Harm_V_1_0.pdf

Sample Controlled Substance Agreement Developed by The Greater Louisville Medical Society http://kbml.ky.gov/substance-abuse/Pages/default.aspx

Kentucky Board of Medical Licensure, House Bill 1 Ordinary Regulations Effective March 4, 2013 http://kbml.ky.gov/hb1/Pages/House-Bill-1-Ordinary-Regulations.aspx

Medical Licensing Board of Indiana, Emergency Rule (Pain Medications) http://www.in.gov/pla/files/Emergency_Rules_Adopted_10.24.2013.pdf

Indiana Pain FINAL RULE (Effective November 1, 2014):
http://www.in.gov/legislative/iac/20141105-IR-844140289FRA.xml.html

 

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James Patrick Murphy, MD, MMM attended medical school at the University of Louisville, interned in Psychiatry at the San Diego Naval Hospital, studied at the Naval Aerospace Medical Institute, and later served as a Naval Flight Surgeon onboard the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Enterprise.  He returned to Louisville for residency training in Anesthesiology after which he completed a Pain Medicine Fellowship at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. Dr. Murphy is board-certified in Anesthesiology, Pain Medicine, and Addiction Medicine. He is President of the Greater Louisville Medical Society, Medical Director of Murphy Pain Center, Assistant Clinical Professor at the University of Louisville School of Medicine, and serves on the board of the International Association for Pain and Chemical Dependency. In May 2013 Dr. Murphy earned a Master of Medical Management degree from the University of Southern California Marshall School of Business.

Dr. Murphy’s blog is The Painful Truth. He can be found on TWITTER by searching @jamespmurphymd. His President’s eVoice and other communications & videos can be accessed at the Greater Louisville Medical Society website.