National Pain Care Providers Day

meryl

Every dog has his day, right?

In our culture, groups, individuals, and even inanimate objects are frequently honored with their very own special twenty-four hours. These days of recognition give us pauses to examine their meanings and further their causes.

But there’s a compassionate and deserving group of people who have not yet made the list…the caring people who treat our pain. 

For now, National Pain Care Providers Day is only a dream.

It doesn’t exist.

It should.
It can.
And it will…with your help.

National Pain Care Providers Day
March 20, 2015

npcpd hands screen

It’s time to recognize all who generously and selflessly strive to alleviate suffering. This includes physicians, dentists, nurses, therapists, emergency responders, trainers, masseuses, pharmacists, caregivers, mothers and anyone who gives of her or himself to ease pain.

Why is National Pain Care Providers Day necessary?

Pain is universal. It is the most common medical complaint. There is no escaping it. Pain touches every life. And as our population continues to age,  pain is occurring in epidemic proportion.

Pain care is sometimes simple and sometimes extremely complicated. Caregivers can feel tremendous pressure from government agencies, police, lawyers, administrators, addicts, abusers, patients, families, administrators, insurance providers, and the media. As a result, caregivers are too often reduced to feeling “You’re damned if you do and damned if you don’t.”

In reality, they should be praised because of what they do.

Caregivers who persevere deserve our support, gratitude and, at the very least, a day of recognition.

Popular opinions regarding pain care and treatments are evolving rapidly. Taking a special day to spotlight best practices and inspire possibilities would not only bolster the advancement of this vital field of medicine, it would encourage the legions of those who suffer in lonely silence. Less suffering and better lives for all are the goals.

Celebrating National Pain Care Providers Day on March 20, 2015 – the first day of spring – is akin to celebrating hope. From this day forward, the vernal equinox, light overcomes darkness.

RAINBOW SCREEN

So let’s join together and recognize the first day of spring, March 20, 2015, as National Pain Care Providers Day. Let’s make this day special for the special people who treat our pain. Start by sharing your comments and ideas on this blog and/or emailing paincareprovidersday@gmail.com. Pass along the message on social media (Twitter, Facebook, etc.) and contact your civic leaders. Be a vital part of this movement.

Let Hercules himself do what he may,
The cat will mew and dog will have his day.
~ William Shakespeare’s Hamlet

You are the playwright now.
The parchment is blank.
Imagine.
Create.

And celebrate!

National Pain Care Providers Day
March 20, 2015

npcpd screen

 

*

Basic Pain Care Certification

o-WOMAN-CRYING-CLOSE-UP-facebook

The consequences of pain…

A young mother is terrified helplessly watching her child spiral toward death in anaphylactic shock, because she did not know that an allergy to aspirin could also mean an allergy to ibuprofen.

An elderly man is no longer breathing, because he mistakenly thought he could break his pill in half to save money; when in fact, this caused the immediate release of a lethal dose from his time-release pill. He will die before the ambulance can arrive but could have been saved by a simple subcutaneous injection.

A business executive is transfused her tenth unit of whole blood, but it will not save her from dying from the hemorrhaging ulcer caused by excessive over-the-counter pain medications.

A young football star slumps silently in a corner at his high school friend’s party. Pills acquired from various unlocked medicine cabinets are coursing through his arteries. In three days his grieving parents will be struggling with the decision to remove him from life support.

With alarming frequency, stories like these touch every family.

All are preventable.

 

The consequences of pain…

 

More costly than cancer.

More deadly than car crashes.

More likely than a heart attack.

More common than the common cold.

 

With pain being so ubiquitous, so serious, so PAINFUL, why do we still not know how best to deal with the pain epidemic?

Perhaps, it is precisely because we don’t know?

Then, we should learn.

We should become knowledgeable, skilled, competent, and even certified.

Screen Shot 2014-08-05 at 11.10.30 PM

By “we” I mean everyone – not only health care providers. Pain and pain’s consequences touch every life. We all have a stake.

Lifeguards, plumbers, electricians, firemen, police, pilots, engineers, lawyers, nurses, pharmacists, physicians, etc., etc., etc., must earn certifications. Similarly, by the millions, people of all ages achieve certification in Basic Life Support – and we regularly hear stories of how a bystander stepped in to save a life. A standardized and universal understanding of pain, its treatments, complications, emergencies, and prevention could have similar results.

This point is bolstered by a recent letter from the American Society of Addiction Medicine calling upon the White House to:

…focus holistically on provider and community education, overdose death prevention and increased access to treatment, in order to effectively manage the (opioid) epidemic.

Knowledge is power.

It is time we, as a community, put that power to work.

The roadmap is clear. Like the American Heart Association’s Basic Life Support certification, Basic Pain Care (BPC) can be taught in a standardized algorithmic manner. Learning can be didactic and hands-on. For most, it would only take a few hours to master the skills, earn the certification, and acquire the confidence.

 

A Basic Pain Care curriculum might include:

- Wellness and prevention (diet, exercise, stress)

- Acute care (ice, heat, etc.)

- Over the counter medications

- Prescription medications

- Opioids

- Alternative and complementary treatments

- Drug abuse prevention, recognition, and treatment

- Regulations

- Pitfalls and risks

- Emergency procedures (overdose, seizure, etc.)

 

Imagine how confident you would feel if you knew the best and safest way to treat pain, regardless of the situation – acute, chronic, traumatic, post-operatively, and palliative. Imagine that everyone knew.

 

Imagine the suffering that would be eased.

Imagine the resources that would be spared.

Imagine the lives that would be saved.

Imagine the tears that would never be shed.

 

Now make it real. Join with me in establishing the Basic Pain Care Certification. We can start by getting connected. Share this article. Offer your comments. Follow my Confluential Truth blog and the Twitter account @jamespmurphymd. Email your thoughts to basicpaincare@gmail.com.

Change the consequences of pain.

*

*   *

*   *   *

m hug

*   *   *

*   *

*

Talking Trash

cj title

On July 8, 2014, the Louisville Courier-Journal ran a front-page article about how hard it is to find a drug disposal drop-off in Louisville.  No mention was made of trashing the leftover meds.  Here is the letter to the editor I sent in response on July 10, 2014.

letter to editor

Dear Courier-Journal,

Drug abuse is epidemic.  So no one should trash talk about Martha Elson’s excellent article, Drug Disposal Boosted by Boxes.  But the trash is exactly where leftover abusable drugs can go.  Ms. Elson exposed the number one suppliers of abused pills, and surprisingly, it’s not the doctors. It’s you and me. In fact, about two-thirds of all abused pills come from family and friends, often right out of unlocked medicine cabinets.  As a specialist in Pain Medicine and Addiction, I require my patients to lock up their medications and properly dispose of any leftovers.  But with so few drug drop-off boxes available, what’s a responsible person to do?

Trash them!

oscar

Yes, if you can’t get to a drop-off box, the FDA says it is acceptable to throw your old medications in the trash, provided you first “doctor them up” a bit. Simply mix the pills with kitty litter or coffee grounds.  Seal it in a leak-proof bag (like a zip-lock) and toss it in the garbage.  Easy.

dispose

The more potent the drug is, the greater the need for disposal of the unused leftovers.  The FDA has even determined that the danger from keeping unused powerful narcotics is so ominous, that flushing leftovers down the toilet is acceptable when a drop-off box is unavailable.ty d bol

The Environmental Protection Agency is OK with this policy.  And the FDA says there has been no indication of adverse environmental effects due to flushing leftover pills.

However, leftover pills do contribute to adverse societal effects.  About one-fourth of high school age youth have abused prescription drugs. Approximately three Americans die every hour of every day from a drug overdose.  More Kentuckians die from overdose than die in automobile accidents.  A very large percentage of these overdose deaths involve prescription drugs.

Ms. Elson’s timely article brought to light the progress we are making.  More and more drug drop-offs are becoming available.  We should take advantage of them when we can.  But please do not let your busy schedule, your concern for the environment, or your unfamiliarity with regulations deter you from properly disposing your unused medications.  We are battling a drug abuse epidemic.  People are dying.  Make sure you are not an unwitting supplier. You may save the life of someone you love…  And that’s not talking trash.

trash talk

*

*

*

 

Is it the singer or is it the song?

I love music.

I am not what one might call “musical.” I don’t have the pipes of a Whitney Houston (see: The Star Spangled Banner) or the soulfulness of a Bob Dylan (see: Blowing in the Wind), but I appreciate their unique virtuosity.

I am a pain care physician. Pain, like music, is a sensory and emotional experience. I don’t sing or play. I touch and treat.

Sometimes I may hit the perfect note, perform the perfect procedure, compose the perfect plan of care.

Other times, despite being well versed, my plan of care may not strike the right chord. Then creating a pleasant sensory and emotional experience depends upon the passion and conviction with which my care is conducted; my song is sung.

Is it the singer or is it the song?

Is it the caregiver or is it the care given?

Music is not only intertwined with my pain care. It is woven into every aspect of my life, including my Twitter feed.

Begging the question: Is it the tweeter or is it the tweet?

Let’s find out.

For a about a year I have been composing a Twitter message or two per day. Recently, I went back and was able to find forty tweets that were “musical” in some way. It may not be America’s top forty, but I think Casey Kasem would still have been pleased.

casey kasem b and w

There are songs from rock, country, and classical genres; from musicals, commercials, television, and the silver screen. Some are serious; some are silly. Original works, live performances, even parodies.

I now invite you to take a little journey through my musical tweets. Click on the image and the link should take you right to the performance. See if you can guess the song before you link to it. Ponder how it relates to the message. Enjoy the sensory and emotional experience. And decide for yourself…

Is it the tweeter or is it the twuuth* ?

 

* twuuth (definition)

  • noun\ˈtwüth\ the twuuth : the truth in a tweet

 

#40

1 25 oct 13

25 October 2013  How the Ghost Stole Pain Care. Dramatic reading by Phil Ward and music composed by Megan McIver

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/393876826809843712/photo/1

http://vimeo.com/77715467

 

#39

2 21 dec 13

21 December 2013  A Winter’s Solstice

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/414443104792354816?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kh_sckAUkgE&list=PLe1seBFJFklgHIqjjUUUhxZmL_rchZau9

 

#38

3 10 jan 2014

10 January 2014  Act Naturally

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/421697528891854848/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c-07qmTUi9A

 

#37

4 12 jan 2014

12 January 2014 Les Miserables

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/422410734950043648/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HPIos2mXbUE

 

#36

5 26 jan 14

26 January 2014 I’m Only Sleeping

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/427318581399789569/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KAsr-hix9s

 

#35

6 10 feb 14

10 February 2014 The Gold and Beyond

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/433042987648417792?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2hBB4DPw-h4

 

#34

7 12 feb 14

12 February 2014 ABC

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/433632926316515329/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I8GvDLDYhNM

 

#33

8 12 feb 14

12 February 2014 Hearing Winter

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/433655563193286656/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VaXGGPVNnxU

 

#32

9 17 feb 14

17 February 2014 The Way We Were

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/435621354222526464/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6VhNaXV8K4U

 

#31

10 17 feb 14

17 February 2014 Peace of Mind

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/435639476686045184/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q5ZL8qvEmR0

 

#30

11 21 feb 14

21 February 2014 Doctor Pat

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/437033465536462849/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vuUpSnPXz0

 

#29

12 22 feb 14

22 February 2014 Honesty

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/437388430465462273/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4gOIt-M02A

 

#28

13 2 mar 14

2 March 2014 My Bologna

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/440310294867234816/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rmPRHJd3uHI

 

#27

14 5 mar 14

5 March 2014 Oklahoma

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/441273659001286657/photo/1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbrnXl2gO_k

 

#26

15 14 mar 14

14 March 2014 Hair

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/444682878396293120?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Qf2R-1saDQ

 

#25

16 29 mar 14

29 March 2014 Stupid

 

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/449943660134555649?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ers0YPoMxbk

 

#24

17 4 apr 14

4 April 2014 Words

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/452173873299980291?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sr-WW5abcwQ

 

#23

18 7 apr 14

7 April 2014 Oops

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/453267038077984768?refsrc=email

http://vimeo.com/54035300

 

#22

19 9 apr 14

9 April 2014 Call On Me

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/453922140312440833?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wh86uSsux1M&feature=kp

 

#21

20 17 apr 14

17 April 2014 Lights Went Out

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/456764575258402816?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uSSJwKixbKU

 

#20

21 19 apr 14

19 April 2014 Little Wonders

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/457546932161110016?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tWU8_uUJJu0

 

#19

22 28 apr 14

28 April 2014 Undun

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/460961322163642368?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QzSLxYLuJhI

 

#18

23 15 may 14

15 May 2014 I’m Sorry 

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/467135943741157378?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4a_vhiBxi90

 

#17

24 5 june 14

5 June 2014 Let It Go

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/474655637620535296?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EtAG3e3JLNI

 

#16

royals

5 June 2014 We Will Never Be Doctors

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mxyNzqQNa50

 

#15

25 7 june 14

7 June 2014 Daniel Boone 

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/475246656968200192?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VLMCO-JZqWs

 

#14

26 10 jun 14

10 June 2014 Turn It Off

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/476212528289038336?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JjCfE1n6nW4&list=PLf470HqOWw3d8Oj5uAXPV19yJ7E7aGDwX&index=163

 

#13

27 13 jun 14

27 June 2014 Don’t Stop Me Now

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/477316980274237440?refsrc=email

http://vimeo.com/30126989

 

#12

28 14 jun 14

 14 June 2014 It’s a Grand Old Flag

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/477902903290515457/photo/1

http://fan.tcm.com/_James-Cagney-You39re-a-Grand-Old-Flag/video/1146300/66470.html?createPassive=true

 

#11

29 15 jun 14

15 June 2014 In the Living Years 

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/478362296126013440?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bWiwde4z9Qk

 

#10

30 16 jun 14

16 June 2014 Pressure

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/478599157926473728?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJCTgtDU-74

 

#9

31 21 jun 14

21 June 2014 Sunrise

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/480542585535352832?refsrc=email

http://vimeo.com/88197078

 

#8

32 27 jun 14

27 June 2014 Listen

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/482653910616666112?refsrc=email

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K5aRRq9mquo

 

#7

33 29 jun 14

29 June 2014 Rumor Has It 

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/483451855125479424/photo/1

http://vimeo.com/41795630

 

#6

34 the letter

1 July 2014 The Letter

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/484055472618500096

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vrv9slgO7Ic

 

#5

35 all together now

2 July 2014 All Together Now

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/484446529210445824

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xFpW8g83g6E

 

#4

36 dialogue

4 July 2014 Dialogue

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/484941146976567296

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YTL53bmYqzM

 

#3

37 danger zone

4 July 2014 Danger Zone

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/484955780253106177

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=58QOBqAWNzE

 

#2

38 if you want it

6 July 2014 If You Want It Here It Is 

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/485956691708477442

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KWbTZuEWjnc

 

And the #1 musical tweet in the land is…

39 stipe tweet

7 July 2014 Everybody Hurts 

https://twitter.com/jamespmurphymd/status/486224816618213376

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ijZRCIrTgQc

 

*

keep you feet on the ground

 

*

*

 

STRENGTH IN NUMBERS

office M

Show up at my office on a typical Friday afternoon and the waiting room generally will be well populated. People in groups of threes, twos, and solitary ones are scattered about, flipping through magazines, glancing at wristwatches, a few even catnapping, waiting to hear their names called.

However, on this Friday everyone was assembled in one end of the room, all facing the same direction, all listening to the same thing, all sharing in the same experience.

talking to

I still don’t have an official name for the happening, but I’ve nicknamed it a “SIN” session, i.e. Strength In Numbers.  However, there’s nothing sinful about it.

Strength in Numbers is geared toward patients, is part classroom, part group therapy, and entirely beneficial to all participants – including me.

I had no trouble selecting the didactic elements. My practice is located on the border between Kentucky and Indiana – two states that have recently enacted laws and regulations for treating pain with controlled substances.

bridge

Both states’ regulations are instructive regarding educational requirements.

Kentucky’s regulations mandate:

A physician prescribing or dispensing a controlled substance shall take appropriate steps to educate a patient receiving a controlled substance.

There’s even a list of educational points to consider on the Kentucky Medical Board’s website.

Not to be outdone, Indiana’s regulations state:

The physician shall discuss with the patient the potential risks and benefits of opioid treatment for chronic pain, as well as expectations related to prescription requests and proper medication use.

Hoosier State regulations go on to list specific educational points that prescribers must cover with patients that include obtaining a patient’s informed consent.

agree

Obviously, to obtain informed consent a patient must be informed.

Indeed, most states’ regulations require that physicians educate their patients. The Federation of State Medical Boards agrees:

The physician’s duty includes not only appropriate prescribing of opioid analgesics, but also appropriate education of patients… inadequate attention to patient education (is a clear) departure from accepted best clinical practices.       

But, aside from the learning part, there is another, less precise, less quantifiable, factor in the equation that produces strength at these Friday afternoon get-togethers.

The numbers.

A group dynamic is quite therapeutic. For some time, psychology researchers have been able to show that group therapy is a “powerful intervention.”

Groups foster a community spirit; a sense that “I’m not in this alone.”

The group offers a sounding board. Members can help each other come up with specific ideas for improving a difficult situation or life challenge and even offer some accountability along the way.

The key therapeutic principles involved in group therapy include:

*Hope: Being with people who are coping or recovering gives hope to others who may be running short on this.

*Universality:  People see that they are not alone.

*Information: They help each other by learning and sharing a consistent message.

*Altruism: Self-esteem and confidence is boosted by sharing and helping others.

*A sense of family: The therapy group is much like a family in some ways. And because the group shares common goals, members gain a sense of belonging and acceptance.

Now, more and more, group sessions are utilized in the treatment of conditions other than purely psychological. The American Academy of Family Physicians has stated their belief that “group visits are a proven, effective method for enhancing a patient’s self-care of chronic conditions, increasing patient satisfaction, and improving outcomes.”

So, on this Friday afternoon we had a group “SIN” session. It started with a little levity and a brief informative video.

dr pat

Next, some definitions were explained, risks and alternatives were discussed along with “SMART” goals and proper stewardship of the medications. Patient responsibilities were explained. The educational points required by the Bluegrass and Hoosier States were covered. Some Q & A was encouraged throughout. It was interactive.

This was not a purely didactic session. There was eye contact and emotional contact. After all, pain is defined as a sensory and emotional experience.

And in the end, the participants didn’t just feel like a number.

And they had more strength to do battle.

As did their doctor.

On this atypical Friday afternoon.

There truly is strength in numbers.

Fireworks-047-screen

Giving them the business

Screen Shot 2014-06-22 at 11.21.32 PM

On May 22, 2014 the University of Louisville Residents’ Business seminar was the last group I would address as President of the Greater Louisville Medical Society. It went something like this…

hello 2 screen

I didn’t have a course like this when I was a resident.

I wish I had.

Somewhere between respiratory acidosis and cardiac preload, learning to read a spreadsheet could have been worked in.

But it wasn’t.

You’re very fortunate that your university is enlightened and generous enough to offer this course for you.

Today, with healthcare taking up about 20% of our nation’s GDP, there are many non-medical types grasping for our nation’s healthcare steering wheel.

Soon you will be finishing your residencies.

You’ll board the healthcare industry train.

You can either be a passenger or a driver.

It’s your choice.

As I prepared for today’s seminar, I thought about what I would say to myself if I could time travel back fifteen years to when I was sitting where you are now, finishing my residency.

3 balls screen

I would tell myself that there are three balls I will have to juggle.

The first ball is your “clinical” ball. Thus far, keeping this ball in the air has been the primary focus of medical school and residency training. Patients’ needs must be met. Your patients must be well.

The second ball is your “family” ball. You’re not on this journey alone. Your loved ones and close friends depend upon you as much as you depend upon them. Lose their support and the stress of being a physician can be overwhelming. Your family must be well.

The third ball is your “self” ball. Do not neglect your own health, outside interests, passions, talents, or loves. Your self must be well.

juggle screen

The best way to keep these balls in the air is by juggling them yourself. Don’t delegate that job. Even though most of you will be employed, avoid dependence by becoming as comfortable in boardrooms as you are in operating rooms. You must not ignore the business of medicine.

*

open letter screen

(A letter arrives. It is from the future. It reads…)

Dear 2014 Me,

I’m writing you from the year 2025. Physicians are no longer considered necessary. They just get in the way. Healthcare is a mess. It’s all based on metrics. Everything is quantified and graded. There is no creativity. No innovation. No flexibility. No passion. No compassion. But at least we get to go home when the whistle blows at three p.m.

Yours truly,

2025 Me

*

letter 1 screen

This does not have to be our default future. We can do better. But only if we have physicians willing to lead. And physician leaders now must understand the business of medicine, or else medicine will be nothing more than a business. We must be in boardrooms and wrestle back control of the steering wheel.

*

letter 2 screen

(Another letter from the future arrives…)

Dear 2014 Me,

I’m writing you from the year 2025. Physicians are the essential driving force in medicine. Metrics are used to add structure to the art of medicine, not to govern or discipline. The patient-physician relationship is secure and flourishing. Creativity, innovation, and compassion fuel our passions. I don’t know what you told those residents back in 2014, but it must have worked. Thank them for me and for all of us.

 Yours truly,

2025 Me

*

Someone here must have listened. Someone decided to fill the vacuum created by the lack of physician business leadership. Someone stepped up and took firm grasp of the steering wheel guiding our nation’s healthcare. Someone refused to accept our default future.

Who was it?

hands 2

*

*

 

Continuity of Care

TourtheTower

On June 1, 2014 at Louisville’s historic and newly renovated Water Tower, the Greater Louisville Medical Society held its annual Presidents’ Celebration.

crowd at watertower

As outgoing president I had the honor of introducing Dr. Bruce Scott – my esteemed colleague and childhood friend – as our new President. I also thanked some of the many great folks who worked so hard to make this the most satisfying year of my professional life.

pat and bruce screen

Before I handed over the President’s gavel to Bruce and assumed my new role as Chair of the GLMS Board of Governors, I had this to say…

pat podium

A year ago, as your newly elected President, the last words I said on that stage were:

The Greater Louisville Medical Society is our organization, our tribe, our road to a place where medicine is both science and art, where our community enjoys wellness, and the sacred bond between our patients and us is secure. And my goal this year is to see us united.

murphy speech at pres celeb

It’s one year later, and our profession is under attack as never before. Physician burnout is an epidemic. This is why, more than ever, we must be united.

Back in the day, physicians were a more homogenous group. There were fewer specialists. We shared common values and common goals.

Now government, employers, specialties, patients, and family pull us in many directions. There is an ever-increasing burden for maintenance of board certifications and licensure. Each separate payer and practice facility requires its own credentialing. Medical liability risks keep mounting. The insatiable quest for quantifying quality with data points and benchmarks threatens to crush our creativity and mandate cookbook-style care. Rival non-physician tribes continuously grab pieces of what used to be our acknowledged scope of practice.

How do we respond? All too often by retreating to presumed “safe houses” provided by the one, two, three or more specialty societies each of us believes offers the most protection of our turf.

Got to survive, you know.

The irony is that these refuges are not safe at all. They are static. Stationary. It makes us benign targets for attack by all who would prefer a leaderless mechanized conveyor belt of universal one-size-fits-none healthcare. This sanctimonious deconstruction of our profession is done in homage and servitude to the inscrutable holy trinity of cost-effectiveness, quality, and value.

Survive?

Why not thrive!

Regardless of where your professional journey has led, you and I and our colleagues remain connected at our roots. We still share common values and must share common goals. We are physicians by education, oath, and calling.

And more…

We love our profession.

We love humanity.

And we love each other.

That is why we get up every day, put on our white coats, and go out to save the world.

Because it must be saved.

And we know…

We are the ones who must do it.

United.

gavel trophy